#213 : Ladius

A great treasure awaits you! Imagine this, a power source from an ancient civilization that can also act like an elixir which can grant life, the Rido. A young nomadic trio will be our guides and along the way they end up meeting new friends and familiar foes. Sounds exciting right, but there is a catch… this presentation is technically a mecha anime as well… only the last 10–15 minutes though. Oh you like giant robots, well then I have an OVA for you… meet Makyou Gaiden Le Deus, often translated as just Ladius. Or should it just be Le Deus? … to good friends Ladius can be called The Deuce and yes, I made that up!

Ladius_1Finding opening credit music from my favorite anime is one music category I sometimes like to listen to. Now and then I come across a track that sounds really rockin’ yet it does not ring a bell of familiarity. This was my introduction to Ladius and as I really, really loved the song I had to track down the original video. After watching I would scratch my head, HEY!, how come we never saw a release for this here in the West? I believe the UK had a subtitled VHS release way back when but nothing of the such ever happened over in my neck of the woods. This would have been a great seller, I mean I would have bought it, as it had many of the tropes that we all like in adventure and mecha titles. Reminds me of “How many licks does it take to get to the the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop? … The world may never know”. If I was in charge it would have been different, but I was not and I still am not in that position. Thank you fansubbers for all you do!

Ladius_2This red disc, a beautiful lens, one of the Eyes of Zalem is much like a key that opens one of the fabled lost treasure troves of the Rido that is located in the ruins of the Quall civilization at Zalem. Viewing the night sky through this lens also is a treat as well and it is this very act where we meet Riot and his two lady cohorts, Spica and Seneca. This trio on the go are on a mission to discover this refuge of the Rido, but first they must make a quick stop at a little town known as Zigoa to find another Eye of Zalem and in the process meet another key component to our quest. Yuta, a young lady who runs a shop in Zigoa is quite bored from the mundane is soon visited by Riot and crew. Yuta holds this other Eye of Zalem which is also wanted by a gang of theives. Damage ensues and guess who gets the bill, a coy grinning Riot.

Ladius_3Mixing genres makes Ladius a fun OVA. Much like a treasure hunting adventure in the style of a Lupin III caper, we get instead a fantasy environment found in the more quest like and imaginative Birth and Dragon Ball with the Ladius plot for discovering the Rido. Yet finding lost artifacts is only part of the equation. We do have mecha elements as well, which reminds me a little of Dangaioh in terms of fun and action packed robot sparring. Plus our main man Riot has some rockin’ awesome hair and a jumpsuit which is so de rigueur for 1980s heroic fashion. Yet why do I feel this is like a 90s anime when this was made in 1987? Maybe because Ladius can get comedic at times and comedy with questing makes me think of Slayers? All in all, Ladius may not be the most unique combination of elements, but in terms of mecha presentations it stands out as a little different… and in a good way.

Ladius_4Broken record time… time to add yet another oddball OVA release to the shelf of awesome 80s anime. I swear I keep finding these one off releases and they never disappoint in any fashion. I do question as to why only one solitary release? Ladius only reveals one chapter in the longer quest of Riot and the girls, yet there is so much more to discover and to tell. Again I am thankful for what we do have because what we do have is a great example of 80s OVA excellence. My only warning is beware the offering of a jigu nut, it may not agree with you!

#212 : Superbook (Series 1)

Can one judge a book by its cover? An old saying and yeah we know that answer, but it’s worth stating. This time round I want to talk about not just any old book, but in fact one known as Superbook. Wait a minute I have heard of that book? It talks and tells stories and transports you into the stories like magic. And yes Superbook does have an alternate name that is more familiar to many of us, ever hear of The Bible? Many titles are often considered gateway drugs that got us into anime. For some of you, depending on your upbringing, Superbook may have been that very series. So where do we begin? Well, let’s start at the house down the street and around the corner!

SB_1Biblical tales have been represented many times in terms of presentation outside of The Bible itself. Live action movies and TV shows, books, brochures, games, various western animated titles and even… anime? Well why not, Japan has adapted almost everything into an animated product including The Bible. Now how did our example of Superbook come about? A joint production between Tatsunoko studios and the American Christian Broadcasting Network, Superbook would serve it’s function on both sides of the Pacific with respective dubs. In America, Superbook would be amongst the many other CBN programs in the lineup while in Japan it was CBN’s hope that this show would be an avenue of introducing the Christian faith towards the population.

SB_2Many of the familiar biblical names appear in Superbook: Jonah, Noah, Joshua… even Jesus. Yet I don’t recall Chris Peeper, his friend Joy and his crusader toy robot that comes to life, Gizmo (Gremlins influence?). Meet our trio of children who through the magic of Superbook get to transport back into time to actually live through The Bible. So that’s the excuse you two kids have for spending so much time in Chris’ bedroom? Hmm? Each episode introduces a new scenario and individual to highlight, mostly Old Testament stories in this batch of 26 episodes. Chris and Joy could have been ripped from one of Tatsunoko’s Time Bokan series, but the biblical characters more often than not end up looking different and often subpar. Maybe budget constraints or creative expression? I mean some of them look kind of funky. Besides that each episode is entertaining and usually has some merit of the dramatic. Just don’t forget to wind up the key in the back of Gizmo! Oh my spring.

SB_3Beyond your choice of faith, belief system, or non-belief in anything, The Bible may have something to teach you. I myself do not prescribe one particular faith, though I consult Buddhist, Native American and Ancient Greek wisdom often, I also find value in The Bible through esoteric and metaphorical meaning. After all these stories have been told numerous times under different names from various cultures in some form or another. Much like the Hero With a Thousand Faces, thank you Joseph Campbell, I find that The Bible does speak of universal and human truths that even though being thousands of years old, are still relevant in whatever fashion you deem to interpret. Superbook takes these usual narratives in a much more simplified approach as an anime for children and while there may be a little of the cheese factor, it’s kinda cute when you get into it.

SB_4Many titles are often credited as early attempts at bringing anime to the West before 1990. Speed Racer, Star Blazers, Battle of the Planets, Voltron and Robotech are a handful of usual suspects, but over there in the corner was Superbook as well. While this is “technically” a “Christian” series, it is also a fantasy story, an adventure, a fun and slightly cheesy cartoon, an anime. Why all the labels because of specific subject matter? Superbook is in my mind no different than say Ulysses 31, or The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as examples in terms of adventure, fantasy and fun. Again why all the labels? All anime no matter your color, creed, belief or popularity status are welcome under this roof at my house. …which by the way is not so much down the street, or around the corner.

#211 : Arei no Kagami: Way to the Virgin Space

Do you believe the universe has an edge where beyond that boundary is untouched, pure… virginal?. If space and the universe are infinite, how can there be an edge? We now are about to enter the realm of imaginative sci-fi space fantasy… rules and reason, yeah let’s leave that at the door. Ever hear of Arei no Kagami: Way to the Virgin Space? Like many obscure titles from the 1980s this was an unknown for me as well, but something about Arei no Kagami invited me in with something very familiar.

AnK_1Upon quick glance of the characters one who is in the know would easily recognize that Arei no Kagami is a part of Leiji Matsumoto’s portfolio of work. His hallmark style surrounds the visual appeal of the likes such as Galaxy Express 999 and Queen Millennia, amongst many others, but Arei no Kagami has many other similarities. A young boy in the company of a beautiful blonde woman on a sci-fi themed journey is a common theme expressed in the other two Matsumoto productions, but for Arei no Kagami we see a variation with an auburn female lead instead, Maya. Along with her is the young Meguru and both of them escape a planet torn apart by war to search for the promised land, the edge of the universe, Arei. Onboard as well is a stowaway android, Zero, who also yearns to find this special zone.

AnK_2Created specifically for Expo ’85, The International Exposition, Tsukuba, Japan, 1985, Arei no Kagami would fit into the future oriented theme of the event. And while progress and the hope of things to come were the main focus, Arei no Kagami would also question much about humanity’s past actions. The dark side of war, hatred and mistreatment towards the environment and other humans would be brought forth to our trio of space explorers who must defend the human race’s more redeeming qualities. Architecture, the arts and advancements in science and philosophies would be presented as a counterpoint. Yet the entry into the virgin space of the universe demands the most noble of hearts… can these three characters pass the test of showing that the human race is far more than our past sins?

AnK_3Matsumoto’s Arei no Kagami was a fellow classmate to his former Yamato partner Yoshinobu Nishizaki’s Odin: Photon Sailer Starlight (Oh! ODEEN!). And as different as both men are (artist vs. businessman literally), both productions are literally… light years apart in many ways. Arei no Kagami is short (20–25 minutes), a concise story and has a feeling of conclusion. You feel in many ways you made it to the final destination intended. Odin is two plus hours long, confusing, over complicated and end ups going nowhere. I am still “Searching for Odin my love” like many of us. Matsumoto was always the stronger storyteller of the two and while Arei no Kagami is very simple and kind of generic, it does what it does well with a limited time span.