#43 : Vampire Hunter D

Vampire Hunter D is plain and simple, a horror movie… NO… a western. True there are no cowboys, etc. like in a traditional western, but it has all the elements and style of a these films. Only claiming this movie is a horror flick is completely untrue. Yes there are vampires and beasts and lots of gothic references, but still it’s a classic western in the style of Shane where our hero comes in to town to do the business of saving the innocent and has to leave because his destiny is the road less traveled. The road of the one and only… Vampire Hunter D.

VHD_1D himself is an interesting character. Tall, dark and handsome with a glint of danger in his eyes that also show a humanity that is rare to come by. Kind of like Kenshiro of Fist of the North Star or maybe Captain Harlock, D is an example of restraint. Your Clint Eastwood or Gary Cooper type, where being on the road is your destined life. And that destiny is difficult as he is a mixed breed, the dhampir, or the mix of the vampire with a human. Not only is he an outcast, but he hunts down his vampire lineage. So the title is self explanatory, he is ‘Vampire Hunter D’. And while on this road he meets a girl who requires a hunter due to the fact that she was a victim of a vampire, one Count Magnus Lee. In a soft spoken fashion, he agrees to help.

VHD_2This simple farm girl named Doris Lang lives on a farm with her brother Dan and the news of her being bitten by something so ‘unholy’ and ‘unclean’ makes her not to popular in town. The only exception is the playboy son of the mayor Greco, what a douchebag. But with D by Doris’ side she feels a strong sense of security. And the security is needed as the Count sends his daughter Lamika and the fighter Rei Ginsei right of the bat. The action begins and more monsters and adventure awaits. But D also has a partner… in his left hand. One of the creepiest and odd characters I have ever seen, but so cool. Although I would not want some face looking thing in my hand. just my preference.

VHD_3Let me return yet again to Fist of the North Star. The director for both that series and film and this movie is Mr. Toyoo Ashida. His sweeter character designs can be seen in both, though D and a majority of the characters definitely take after the originals of Yoshitaka Amano’s gothic androgyny. The plots for both series are similar and well they can both be a little bit violent. Though the violence in both I agree to be a part of the situation at hand and the story and are not just for pure disgust and shock, like say Violence Jack or M.D. Geist. D is after all a vampire hunter and that job is not one that is clean and tidy. Overall as a movie it is good and entertaining, but far from perfect. As a favorite during the old days of VHS, this was a part of the limited diet of consumption that we had here in the west. It’s still worth a watch, but don’t let nostalgia blind you. But as a popcorn action flick, it’s a gem. And that cheesy English dub from Streamline Pictures has merit and character.

VHD_4If there is one theme ever present… well maybe two that kind of go hand in hand are romance and sexuality. This is a vampire flick and the concept of these blood suckers deals with the ideas of sexual desire and gratification. Both of which the Count and D both possess, but in different ways. The Count feeds on these desires, like a rabid animal he is never satisfied and craves more and more. D, as the definition of restraint, painfully represses his tendencies and desires, which makes even simple intimacy difficult. He after all has to be above the desires for lust and conquest because his human half gives him a conscience. But that conscience and higher calling of morality sacrifices true love as Doris would soon see. She loves D and D loves her, but he can’t fall victim to the lower instinct of sexual liaison as mere conquest. He shows affection through loyalty instead.

Vampire Hunter D is unique in it’s setting and environment. And as I have said before, think of it like a western and question why we don’t have more tales like this with a horror post apocalyptic bend instead of the usual ‘cowboy’ movie. My only advice is to watch out for anything that may go bump in the night. Don’t get bit now, unless that is your thing 😉

#8 : Angel’s Egg

No matter what anyone says, anime is primarily a pop culture vehicle, a marketing tool to promote an already established manga, toy line, established franchise, or at times, a video game. It is true that animation is a skilled craft that requires artists to create the final product from writing to drawing to special effects. But in the end, it is not a piece of fine art that can hang in a posh museum along the likes of Van Gogh, Pollack, or Warhol. All except for this one example that I am aware of.

AE1Angel’s Egg is without question one of of the most uncompromising pieces of animation I have ever seen. It has no agenda to sell you anything. It is art for art’s sake with a story and journey that is left for the audience to decide what it is actually about. Compared to a majority of anime of the 1980s that are big, fun, colorful and or action packed, Angel’s Egg is none of that. Dark, austere, quiet, lyrical, gothic and yet quite beautiful, Angel’s Egg is not an animated movie, but more like a poem come to life through visual interpretation.

AE2The stark, post-apocalyptic world, sets the tone for the only two characters that are to the best of my knowledge, unnamed. The first is a girl who seems curious about the world around her and has as a companion a giant egg that she holds to dearly as if it was a doll. Along her unknown journey she encounters our second character, a young man who ends up tagging along. He is curious about her behavior and the reason she holds dear affection towards the egg. The only thing that I can interpret from this young man is that possibly he may have been a soldier due to the fact he carriers a large weapon like object that looks similar to a giant cross. What sin does he have to bear, or what sin will he commit? Along their journey they witness many a strange sighting from ruins to faceless fishermen who hunt ghost like whales that they can never catch. The ending and turning point like most of the reviews here, I will leave for you to find out.

So where did this film originate from? From the mind’s of two men. The first being the artist and character designer Yoshitaka Amano, a name known to those who are fans of Final Fantasy and Vampire Hunter D. The other is one of Japan’s best known auteur directors, Mamoru Oshii. Production began right after Oshii’s time on Urusei Yatsura, particularly the dream like film Beautiful Dreamer, you could tell he wanted to push the boundaries much further. The act of expressing something very deep and also, very painful. Oshii has stated that he had a hard time getting work after this movie, but you have to give him credit for being brave enough to give the world something this different.

AE3Due to a lot of interpretation of this movie, and most of Oshii’s work in general, many state Christian symbolism and influence. I agree that the symbology can be viewed from a certain point of view, but like any religion, it all comes back to the one truth when studied properly. The theme of Angel’s Egg is in my personal view about a great loss of something very special within one’s life that it makes the pain unbearable to bear any longer. There are many interpretations of what Oshii was trying to express from his own life. What was his pain? Many interpretations can be or may not be correct, but in the end it is how it affects you as the viewer. And the question you must ask, how does this relate to my personal experience? Angel’s Egg, a masterpiece like no other.