Anime Wisdom from Susumu Kodai… War is Bullshit.

Episode 24 of the original Space Battleship Yamato was an episode that left it’s impact on me the first time I saw it. Perhaps the most powerful episode of the total 26? The Yamato and her crew made it all the way to the planet Gamilus where they faced off against the oppressive Gamilan Empire. Together our heroes triumphed over these obstacles thus opening the way to freely get to Iscandar to receive the Cosmo Cleaner/Cosmo DNA to revive the war torn Earth. After the battle a quiet pause occurred where we meet up with our protagonist Susumu Kodai. Below is the translated text from the fansub of the climactic scene after the Yamato’s ‘victory’…

Narrator: There was no city left, only the ruins. After such total destruction, nothing made a sound. Nothing moved. Kodai realized that one of the planets in space just died.

Yuki: What have we done? I can’t face God.

Kodai: We’ve been told to compete and win since childhood. During school or at work, we’re expected to compete and win. But there are losers behind the winners. What happens to the losers? The losers don’t have the right to be happy? I never thought about that, until now. I’m sad, and frustrated to realize it so late. The people of Gamilus wanted to immigrate. This planet would’ve dies anyway. There’s no difference between the people of Earth or Gamilus in hoping for happiness. But we fought. We weren’t meant to fight… …we were meant to love each other. Victory…? Bullshit!

No one wins when we lose our humanity in the face of violence.

#192 : Farewell Space Battleship Yamato: In the Name of Love / Arrivederci Yamato

Certain anime we all fall in love with instantaneously and many titles leave us with an emotional bind that we will never forget. We jump for joy and many times shed tears watching those we love on screen go through hardship. Years ago when I was on my Space Battleship Yamato fix I would eventually come across the films of the original epic franchise that was perhaps the first otakufest of obsession in the world of anime. Their was a certain idealism in the late 1970 and 1980s and it is written all over Yamato, but at one time that idealism almost died and actually was planned as the finality. The initial sequel, Farewell Space Battleship Yamato: In the Name of Love (Arrivederci Yamato), is a large epic that defines space opera tragedy and is one of the most beautiful movies in the genre that also leaves you in tears.

FSBY_1After the success of the 1977 rebooted film version of the first Yamato series the combined power of Yoshinobu Nishizaki and Leiji Matsumoto would strike out again to create a followup that was bigger than the first and for the time a finality. Seamless would be the transition as we followup one year after Earth’s victory against the Gamilas Empire, which also cooresponds with Farewell Space Battleship Yamato’s release dat of 1978. The artwork is a little more polished this second time around and Matusmoto’s character designs and deep emotional idealism injected into the story are ever present again. Fandom was high for Yamato in the late 1970s, how would they respond to this followup film?

FSBY_2This new story of Farewell Space Battleship Yamato is a lot of redo from before, but in many ways it does not matter. A peaceful Earth that is under the threat of alien invasion to destroy humanity, the meeting of an angelic feminine goddess archetype who has a message for the people of Earth and the trials and tribulations of a converted WWII battleship that can navigate the openness of outer space is all familiar territory from the first Yamato story. Familiar faces like Godai, Yuki and the rest of the Yamato crew are back this time with a new captain, Hijikata, and a group of space Marines led by the likable Saito. And let us not forget our new enemy this time round, the Comet Empire, or the Gatlantis Empire, who also have in their service a familiar face. Remember Dessler, Yamato I’s chief villain? He’s alive and has one of the best redemption moments I have ever seen in all of anime. Dessler was in the end an honorable man.

FSBY_3Massively long, two and a half hours of clock time span this is a behemoth of a film and yet it’s the climactic last half hour where the epic of tragedy of watching our beloved friends, the crew of the Yamato, one by one fall to save humanity from the Comet Empire’s invasion. Personal sacrifices of those who give all that they have and give their lives for something greater than what is expected from society are true heroes. My eyes are never dry through this whole time and while some of the crew does survive, it does come at the expense of the beautiful Yamato herself. Many of us are told who to look up to in regards for the heroic, but real heroes are usually never recognized except by our own experience. I will never forget the crew of the Yamato.

FSBY_4Often I question which is my favorite story in the original Yamato franchise? This film is often at the top of the listing along with the alternate TV series retelling, Yamato II. Yamato I also ranks very high, but this film’s epic tragedy, which can be compared to other great films like Grave of the Fireflies and my beloved Windaria, are moments in time that have stuck with me like no other. Farewell Space Battleship Yamato: In the Name of Love is not considered proper canon anymore since the retelling as Yamato II, yet I consider this film one of the prize jewels of what Yamato once was and one of the best anime of the 1970s. … “Free at last, they took you life, they could not take your pride. In the Name of Love…”

#71 : Space Battleship Yamato

When it comes to Space Battleship Yamato, I give the utmost respect. The original super otaku craze has all the justification it truly deserves and it’s not because it has a reputation, or a status of being one of the greatest series in all of anime history. It deserves my total respect, and hopefully yours as well for a singular reason. Science fiction can at times be too impersonal, or at the other extreme, too fun. And yet, Yamato is neither. It’s the beauty of the potential of humanity in the purest sense of the word.

SBY_1By the time I got around years ago to sit and watch the original series from 1974, I knew I was in for something great. I was well aware of Yamato’s pedigree and I considered this to be one of the keystones in the select elite of classic anime that all fans should see. Yamato was required reading so to speak and any other substitute just would not suffice. Initially the concept belonging to producer Yoshinobu Nishizaki, with refinements brought in by a little manga artist by the name of Leiji Matsumoto turned this show from resurrecting the pride of WWII Japan’s naval fleet that flew through space into one of the greatest anti-war epics of all time. But, then again Matsumoto was no slouch when creating epic space dramas with feeling. Any fans of Captain Harlock, or Galaxy Express 999? Yeah I see you 🙂

SBY_2Matsumoto’s touch gave Yamato a humane touch and it is expressed in our two main heros, the young Susumu Kodai and the elder captain, Juzo Okita, the greatest father figure of all. Every time and anytime I witness Captain Okita’s death scene I always shed a tear; you were a good man sir. These two men along with the other members of Yamato including Yuki Mori (token female character), Daisuke Shima (Kodai’s friend) and the remaining crew fly toward the planet Iscandar (awesome name, I think it’s Sanskrit) to meet a woman named Starsha to receive the great Cosmo DNA. This gift is said to help clean the ravaged Earth from all the toil and radiation that has built up from the invasion from the Gamilan Empire. Gamila’s emporer Deslar will stop at nothing to prevent the Earthlings from getting this and in a span of 26 episodes we watch this drama unfold.

SBY_3There are many scenes from anime that have left an indefinite mark on me, but none can hold a candle to the scene after the crew of the Yamato defeated the Gamilan Empire on their home world. Was this a time to celebrate, to shout for victory, to show them who was boss… NO!!!  Absolutely not, because in the scene both Yuki and Susumu saw what that victory brought. Ravaged destruction, death and shock all from what should be seen as victory. How does someone face themselves to the consequences that they have enacted onto another living civilization? After all in the end Gamilas was a dying planet and despite the wrongful actions of it’s people, all that was wanted was to acquire a new home world. As Susumu said that since ‘we’ were young ‘we’ have been taught to win at all costs, but this victory… is quote… ‘bullshit’. In anime as in real life, we have had enough of military conquests. Better to extend a hand in friendship than raise a gun in superiority.

SBY_4This series, very similar to the original Mobile Suit Gundam, was not popular in the eyes of the masses during their original TV runs; a second chance would be around the corner. A theatrical release would resurrect both of these series and turn them into the superstars they are today. And while the film compilations are convenient, they don’t give the whole picture in my eyes. If you can’t watch all 26 episodes of Yamato, then yes see the movie. But… but, if you can witness the whole series there are little stories that make the difference, similar if this was a novel. Or, for bonus points, watch both 🙂 Or, if you are older than me, you would promote the old adaptation of Star Blazers as well. Even though I prefer the original Japanese, this dub, for it’s time, was special.

Space Battleship Yamato has influenced me, has shaped me, helped me ask questions, helped me cry when I needed a cry, helped me smile with I needed a smile. It’s a beautiful thing, as Captain Okita said in his death scene right before returning to Earth… “Earth, everything about you is beautiful.” How has the beauty of Yamato left it’s influence on you?