#230 : Greed

One and only one reason why I searched ever far and wide to track down this obscure OVA from the year of 1985. OK maybe two… 1985 is my beloved heart and home when it comes to anime years, but the major reason for acquiring and watching this hour long production belongs to a single name, Tomonori Kogawa. A veteran of the Japanese animation industry, he is well known to me from his signature character designs which were on feature in this OVA as well as his rare directing and scriptwriting skills. Kogawa would helm two projects where he had total control during the 1980s, the later being 1986’s Cool Cool Bye and the earlier, our feature this time round, 1985’s Greed.

Greed_1Most of Kogawa’s character work can be seen in a variety of mecha shows from the early to mid 1980s. Southern Cross (Robotech: The Masters) would be the first time I enjoyed his slightly angular elf-like faced figures, but it would be his work on shows like Ideon, Xabungle and Dunbine where I would grow a strong appreciation. Like many talents in the industry at the time, Kogawa too would have an opportunity to make an OVA where he had total creative control and have his hands in many areas of the production. And to be honest… I wish he had someone help with the script. Visually Greed is nice and the story has a lot of potential, but it lacks direction flowing from one event into another. I scratched my head many times going, where the heck is this OVA going?

Greed_2Certain elements of Greed reminded me of Ideon and Dunbine, sans the giant robots of course. We begin with what seems to be a fantasy styled sword and sorcery hero’s journey when we first meet protagonist Lid Kyle (Kail) who hears from his father’s deathbed to venture north, seek comrades and defeat a great evil; OK then. Lid sets off and meets a girl and a big guy who can morph into a dragon like creature that leads into meeting a mute warrior who shares the same red spot on his neck as Lid… and I thought it was a unique birthmark, or a production error. Then they get caught in the land of the fairies and then move into a mechanized city where again they meet more people, three to be exact.

Greed_3Turns out one of the three also has the red post on her neck as well and they soon realize they need to take to the stars to combat this great evil. Then they repair a spaceship, head into space getting through some psychedelic light show that they have to endure to end up fighting this guy named Vailly who reminds me of a gremlin. The devilish creature is eventually defeated, thanks to our heroes’ ability to fly in space without oxygen (?), but it does not change anything. WHAT!? Perhaps what Vailly said about the inhabitants collective greed being the real problem was what needed to be addressed instead? The end.

Greed_4Honestly I loved the characters, the artwork, the setting, but Greed was a bit of a disappointment. Perhaps I am being too greedy to expect so much from many anime, but maybe I need to curb my expectations at certain times. Kogawa is a genius designer and artist and has much creative talent, but it did not come to full fruition on this OVA. Would I watch it again, yes (but that is me!), but do I recommend it unless you love Kogawa’s work… except for one fun oddity. The character Mimau has some of the most awesomely teased out BIG hair I have ever seen… girl how much hairspray did you use?

#185 : Aura Battler Dunbine

“Fortunate are those who remember the tales of Byston Well… ,” to quote the text that began many of the opening episodes for the 1983 mecha series Aura Battler Dunbine. Most fortunate are those that learn the lessons from the hardship of war, the downfall of power for selfish gain and the balancing act of dealing with emotional turbulence. Based on an adaptation of a concept from Gundam director Yoshiyuki Tomino that has been reinterpreted several times (Garzey’s Wing, Wings of Rean), Aura Battler Dunbine is a show that one never forgets.

ABD_1Often times I end up in tears when watching certain anime. I often expect this from really great work that brings you into the story. This can either be from something very sentimental between characters, or more often, the death of someone dear to the cast and plot of the show. During the last two episodes of Dunbine, I cried… very hard. The brutality of the war and watching one by one heroes and even sometimes antagonists go down was as painful as many of the largest loses of my life. Dunbine may be Tomino’s most brutal series in terms of his “Kill ’em all” trademark? I would say even more so than the likes of Ideon and Zeta Gundam, two series I truly love. Yet Dunbine is not all dark and gloom, there is a lot of light and at times comedy, but it’s the finale that often defines how a series feels for me in the end.

ABD_2The medieval European influence of Byston Well’s environment was a different take on the usual far future, outer space and/or alien invasion themes so prevalent to traditional mecha anime. Mixed with a form of fantasy laden technology and pagan mythological wonder, Dunbine would include insect like mecha designs (Aura Battlers), psychic powers and even fairy like characters that have a number of translated variations in English. This is a world where individuals like you and me are transported via the Aura Road to Byston Well from Upper Earth to play out in a struggle between power hungry despots, moral crusaders and nature priestesses that control the balance of Byston Well in their hands. A hopeful motorcycle enthusiast, Sho/Show Zama, is one of these select few who lands in Byston Well and learns quickly of the power games and ambitions of one local lord Drake Luft. Sho/Show eventually defects with his acquired Dunbine (his Aura Battler) to the opposing side and eventually earns the trust, as well as admiration of another Upper Earth exile, Miss Marvel Frozen, one of the best female mech pilots of all time. And to top things off Sho/Show acquires a sidekick (maybe cheerleader is a better term?), one of the Ferario (the fairies I mentioned earlier), Cham Huau, one of my favorite characters from Dunbine.

ABD_3Byston Well and the concepts of aura power could relate heavily to our subconscious, both individual and collective. Byston Well was noted for being a place between sea and shore, a land where our souls come to rest after death, or perhaps even before birth. A world of dreams that in one aspect is outside our human existence, yet also running concurrently with it. The use of aura power reminds me of Ideon’s Ide power and Gundam’s newtype abilities. These are latent powers that are within us, where a select few learn to channel them, or awaken to them, like a Gundam newtype. Or perhaps it is the collective energies of our emotions, either peaceful, or destructive that shapes how we correspond with the universe much like Ideon’s Ide. Aura power also makes me think of the concepts: ‘thoughts create things’ and ‘the words we speak create our reality and actions’. Out of the subconscious comes forth our conscious reality.

ABD_4Currently I have watched Dunbine in total twice and I will say like many of Tominos’s shows, it is best to have multiple viewings to gain as much perspective as possible. Tomino can tell a good story, but he does not always give the information in an expected manner. Lastly I can’t dismiss the character designs of Tomonori Kogawa as perhaps my favorite from his vast resume (Ideon, Southern Cross, Cool Cool Bye, Xabungle as examples). As part of a unique trilogy of mecha series created by Sunrise in 1983, including Armored Trooper Votoms and Galactic Drifter Vifam, Aura Battler Dunbine is mecha anime at it’s best featuring a world of fantasy with reality, joy with hardship and spiritual power with technology.

… and let’s not forget Dunbine has some of the most bizarre names ever to be featured in anime. How would you feel to be named Shot Weapon?

#110 : Cool Cool Bye

CCB_1Tomonori Kogawa; can I see a show of hands who enjoys this man’s character designs and artwork? Or perhaps, how many of you know of this man at all? If not I hold nothing against you since he is not a well known name in the vain of say Miyazaki, Yoshitaka Amano or Gundam’s Yoshikazu Yasuhiko. Kogawa was a staple of early 1980s mecha shows; ever see Southern Cross (Robotech’s Masters saga), Ideon, Dunbine, Xabungle, L-Gaim, or even Odin: Photon Sailer Starlight (OH! ODINE!!!!). If you are familiar with these productions then you are framiliar with Kogawa’s particular art style, but he also worked on a couple smaller pet projects as well. One is called Greed, but let’s look at one called Cool Cool Bye for this entry.

CCB_2Cool Cool Bye. Cool Cool Bye. What does this title mean? I don’t know. Sometimes it makes me think of something that a baby would say… like Goo Goo Gah. Not saying that this OVA is for infantile intelligence (it’s not OK), but there is a fun almost child like simplicity to the art style, the dynamics of the motion and the spastic comedy which makes me think of more pompous, or perhaps ‘fancy’ terms like say surrealism, or even dada… oh great now this guy is going into early 20th century fine art… ! …make art, not war people. Cool Cool Bye is for me, kind of like the leftovers of Xabungle and Dunbine (we even have the cute fairy girl archetype again) mixed with something like Birth, or from a more modern eye, Gurren Lagann. This is the basic foundation of Cool Cool Bye and to top it off, this OVA is a manageable half hour of duration.

CCB_3Now since this is only an approximate 25 to 30 minute run, don’t expect something super deep and life changing. Giggles, laughs and ridiculousness is all that is required; popcorn can be optional. We have a basic plot here… two boys who are supposed warriors from a particular tribe are helping a little village get rid of a gigantic mecha known as the Tanguin, or Penguin (the fansub had both, perhaps it may be down to a regional dialect between the characters?) that is stealing all the women for some particular reason. And with a lack of a female population that means no continuation of future generations. Who or what would be stealing all the women… perhaps some dirty old man? AND I JUST SPOILED THE ENDING! Except I forgot to mention that the boys need to fill their stomachs first before any shenanigans can begin. Silly heroes always need to gorge food in anime, at least they won’t go into battle hungry, ya know?

CCB_4And what about the little fairy girl? At first I was like hey it’s Cham/Chum Huau from Dunbine (and whatever her name was in L-Gaim, please don’t make me revisit L-Gaim) in for a little cameo. But no, the little fairy girl transforms and changes into the pretty ‘it’ girl and very funny comic relief towards our duo of heroes. She essentially lays down the rules so to speak (don’t be no naughty boys), but also acts as the deus ex machina or McGuffin device to a pivotal moment near the end. In the ever constant of comedy and hijinks we get a singular moment of sentimentality… nice touch!

While not the most well known OVA, and perhaps there is a reason for this, Cool Cool Bye is a fun oddity of rarity. Not so much a diamond in the rough… more like a happy accident, but one that I was satisfied with. If you don’t enjoy the plot for any reason, just put Cool Cool Bye on mute and enjoy the scenery so to speak (because pretty pictures in the background makes the world a better place!), or make up another script if you are so inclined. For me though, I liked it!