1984… 35 Years (and counting) of Love / A Film Trifecta

1984… ‘Anime’s Golden Summer of Love’. And let me say first and foremost, that this statement is my personal opinion. I am of course paying homage to the famed ‘Summer of Love’ from 1967 that was the high point of the hippie counterculture. An idealistic paradise of sex, drugs and rock n’ roll during an era of intensity and danger. The anime version that I am putting a label on is nothing like 1967, but was a year of ‘Love’ in more ways than one. I was a five year old living in the U.S. during 1984, so I don’t have first hand knowledge of what actually happened in Japan. What I do know is that 1984 could be a serious contender for being a tipping point year in anime. And this is was all down to three beautiful and classic films.

The stars must have been aligned a certain way for a year that featured the directing talents of Noboru Ishiguro with Shoji Kawamori, Mamoru Oshii and Hayao Miyazaki. Three plus one geniuses in terms of animation, story telling and visual presentation. A couple dozen productions made their way into theaters in 1984, but the three movies that these gentlemen directed perhaps… stole the show. One was a reimagining of a popular romantic mecha science fiction TV series, one was a sequel to a film that was part of a long running screwball comedy and the third was an adaptation to an original manga that rocketed it’s creator into superstardom. Funnily enough, only one of the films was released in the summer time, but we are taking this as a collective metaphor.

Let’s start in February of 1984, February 11 to be exact. Oh wow, personal bias… that’s my birthday. This was the release date of Mamoru Oshii’s entry, Urusei Yatsura 2: Beautiful Dreamer. Urusei Yatsura was Rumiko Takahashi’s first huge success and with the successful TV series and manga, films began to follow. The second is the topic of this discussion and it would be the first time that Mamoru Oshii would show his more signature approach to crafting a movie. While Urusei Yatsura was known for high school slapstick silliness, Beautiful Dreamer would show something else. Oshii’s use of the surreal, odd angles, subtlety, lighting and the sublime would be interjected into the project creating something different from the usual Urusei Yatsura fare. These approaches would eventually become his calling cards, but they began to show there potentialities with Beautiful Dreamer.

March 11, 1984. A popular manga from an anime veteran would see release into theaters. This was the work of the now famous Hayao Miyazaki and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind would be his second time behind the directors chair for a film. Miyazaki’s tale of a young heroine passionate for making the world a beautiful and peaceful place struck a chord with audiences and in a BIG way. Nausicaä’s messages of environmentalism and compassion took sci-fi and fantasy down to earth literally. In an era of far out grand space epics, we are thrust to return to our immediate surroundings and confront the issues plaguing in front of us: reconnecting with and preserving nature, witnessing the corruption of power and greed and standing up for what is true and moral that is within our hearts. The film’s success would give us one of Miyazaki’s most beloved characters with Nausicaä, who would become a benchmark for many of his later creations. Miyazaki’s success and growing popularity from Nausicaä would lead him with his partner in crime, Isao Takahata, to found their famed Studio Ghibli.

We now come to summer, July in fact. Debuting on July 7 would be our final film, The Super Dimension Fortress Macross: Do You Remember Love… say that three times fast. Macross was a huge hit on TV for being an amalgam of everything otaku related at the time. Mixing aliens, space opera and mecha with tenderness, romance and beautiful character designs (hooray for Haruhiko Mikimoto!), Macross would reach a large fan base and encapsulated the height of passionate sci-fi idealism of the era. A reinterpreted film would show it’s hand in 1984 bringing the characters back to life yet again after the now defunct TV series left the air. This would be an alternate retelling and helming the directors chairs would be two men, series director and long time industry veteran Noboru Ishiguro and mecha designer/sci-fi fan Shoji Kawamori. Together they resurrected the giant Macross ship for another voyage that left fans, including me, jaw dropped and spellbound.

Of course 1984 was so much more than these three films and in the future I will include a more in depth focus for the year as a whole, but these three movies are something special. This ‘Summer of Love’ came to me because of the fact for the title of the Macross film; an exercise of putting two and two together. But pondering on this title I thought ‘Love’ could stand for a labor of love. All three of these films were created during the analog era of painted cel animation, “Look mom no hands computers.” All three of these films are a testament to the sweat and effort during that era as these productions were well crafted, painstakingly detailed and hold up in terms of quality today. These are three films that I love (one more than the other two because I am an uber fan of Macross) and treasure and I hope that you do as well.

My Favorite Anime Movies from the 1980s

I am usually not one for Top 10 listings to be honest. It’s all subjective and a matter of opinion. Why limit the variety of beautiful things in the world to a select number? Still making a list can be a good exercise and I decided to do this in regards to the animated films Japan created during the 1980s. To be fair, I am going to make two listings here. Why? Many of my favorite choices are a bit on the rare, or esoteric side of the fence and many of the better known, or easier to obtain films deserve a voice as well.

For my favorite listing I will use the following criteria… first, it has to be a film that I genuinely love and am proud to stand up for, anytime and anywhere… second, the movie has to be one that I replay and, or think about often. That’s IT! Keep it simple. For the second listing I will include as many of the films from the 80s that left an impact on me. Now on with the show…

I hope some of these resonate with you and by all means… list your favorites.

 

My 12 Favorites

(in alphabetical order)

ae-ud

Angel’s Egg (1985)
A visual poem that is dark, gothic, symbolic, mysterious and directed Mamoru Oshii. A true piece of fine art that belongs in a museum. To learn more click here.


aomy_4

Arcadia of My Youth (1982)
Captain Harlock on the big screen well before the CG movie. A tale of stoic heroism, honor and following one’s definition of being free. To learn more click here.


ctb_2

Chie the Brat (1981)
An endearing tale about a working class girl, her dysfunctional yet lovable family and the town she lives in. Directed by Isao Takahata. To learn more click here.


DiS_3

The Door into Summer (1981)
There is usually one year, or one summer, that defines us in our journey out of childhood and into adulthood. Once beyond that threshold, there is no return. To learn more click here.


grey3

Grey Digital Target (1986)
A story in a dystopian wasteland where in order to survive and thrive, one must earn their way through fighting and war. To learn more click here.


idem_1

The Ideon: Be Invoked (1982)
The epic conclusion to the Ideon saga. One of the darkest mecha space opera of all time and a powerfully sublime ending as well. To learn more click here.


notgr_4

Night on the Galactic Railroad (1985)
Friendship, sacrifice and the beauty of all that is life all wrapped up though a voyage to the stars on a train. To learn more click here.


Nau_1

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984)
The movie that made Hayao Miyazaki a household name about a righteous heroine in a post nuclear world in search of ecological balance. To learn more click here.


DYRL_5

Super Dimension Fortress Macross: Do You Remember Love? (1984)
Space opera, mecha, romance, aliens and remembering love through a lost culture. Take the original Macross series and multiply it by 100! To learn more click here.


TW11_3

They Were 11 (1986)
A defining tale about trust, growing up and identity for a group of students wanting to pass their final exam onboard a spaceship. To learn more click here.


TtT_2

Toward the Terra (1980)
In the future children are born and raised to become perfect citizens. A new race of evolved humanity contradicts this and declare their individuality. To learn more click here.


Windaria_5

Windaria (1986)
A tale of love and war through the eyes of two young couple showing the price of following what one is expected to due over listening to one’s heart. To learn more click here.

 

The Honorable Listing

(in alphabetical order)

Akira (1988)
Barefoot Gen (1983)
Castle in the Sky (1986)
Crusher Joe (1983)
Dirty Pair: Project Eden (1987)
Fist of the North Star (1986)
Gauche the Cellist (1982)
Grave of the Fireflies (1988)
Kiki’s Delivery Service (1989)
Mobile Suit Gundam: Movie Trilogy (1980/1981)
My Neighbor Totoro (1988)
Patlabor: The Movie (1989)
The Professional: Golgo 13 (1983)
Project A-Ko (1986)
Royal Space Force: The Wings of Honnêamise (1987)
Space Adventure Cobra (1982)
Urusei Yatsura 2: Beautiful Dreamer (1984)
Vampire Hunter D (1985)

#73 : Super Dimensional Fortress Macross: Do You Remember Love?

DYRL_1Wait, wait, this is my favorite part… This is an often quoted statement when watching a movie you love. The thing for me is that for Super Dimensional Fortress Macross: Do You Remember Love? (jeez thats a long title) I say this throughout the whole film, or I have to shut people up so I can listen to each line of dialog. Wait a minute… I usually watch this film by myself… anyway… Do I remember Macross? I do. Do I remember love? I do. Do I love Macross? I most definitely do. Do I remember and love that most awesome movie adaptation Super Dimensional Fortress Macross: Do You Remember Love? I DO!

DYRL_2This sounds like a marriage ceremony with all these I dos, but in truth I am married metaphorically speaking to the original Macross. I don’t have a ring to prove it, so you have to trust me and as a mega fan of the original show, what is my take on the remake that was made for theaters in that magical summer of 1984? Well… it’s hard to be biased and/or objective, but it’s a masterpiece and a half. After all just look at it, no really look at it! NOW! That line work, the quality and care, the special effects and the fluidity of movement are some of the best of the decade. That and Haruhiko Mikimoto’s character design work is at it’s pinnacle here. Some have called it a labor of love as in my mind Macross was the first series made by otaku that ended up being for otaku at the time. It’s the ultimate space opera, mecha and romance story ever told wrapped in the prettiest of packages.

DYRL_3Now here’s a story, ‘do I remember’ (pun! on the title) seeing this the first time? Thankfully I do. Back in the days of VHS and being a bored teenager at the mall I stumbled into a Suncoast store and a tape caught my eye. Now mind you, my knowledge of anime was limited as I was a small town kid in the early 1990s here. I knew of and loved Robotech very much and when out of the blue I saw a tape labeled Clash of the Bionoids, I scratched my head. It looked like Robotech, it had the SDF-1 on the cover and some pictures in the back with Rick and Minmei. I was impressed and bought it. Upon watching it, three things happened. One, this was not Robotech. Two, the drawings looked much better than TV series. And three, it had this weird dub and everyone had different names? With no material to tell me anything I took a guess that this was the original Japanese Macross. I was right.

DYRL_4The plot is similar to the TV series except we start en media res with the Macross already in space and the sprawl of the shopping mall like city already installed. Minmei is in concert, Misa is with Claudia and Captain Global in the Macross’ bridge and Hikaru, Max and Roy are out in space doing their fighter jock best in those classic Valkyrie fighters going up against the Zentraedi armada. OK, par for the course, but what is different besides the already mentioned artistry? First, we get a glimpse of this possible Protoculture civilization, although it is in ruins. Perhaps it is the fabled Lemurian continent often quoted in many anime? And what is found there? A simple love song. A song that would eventually turn the tides of the battle, an established staple of Macross. Second, the budding romance between Hikaru and Misa is more poignant in this movie. The first serious kiss between these two when they were on Earth always makes me giddy. And third, going back to music, and even more epic soundtrack. Macross and music have always gone hand in hand, but this film takes it up a notch or two, ok three… actually four, lol.

DYRL_5On the flip side, I can see how dated this film is in some respects and often cries back to me a lost summer in the sun. The fashion and hair are of the period, but doesn’t it look good anyway? After all there was a quote I once read that the 80s was when anime and real life fashion and hair were one and the same. The inside of the Macross reminds me of how a shopping mall used to look like and in particular at the Holiday Season. Colorful, exciting and full of life. Malls nowadays look like badly branded race cars with corporate logos all over the place, run down and tired. Even with all this, the magic is still there as the optimism I remember growing up that the 21st century was just around the corner and new exciting things were on that horizon. I’m still patiently waiting for space travel and robots.

If ever an anime is to the likes of the biggest celebration, championship or awards ceremony where people say that this is the BIGGEST show in town and matters to the point that you have to be a part of it no matter the circumstances, then Macross DYRL is that anime to me. It’s an apex to my fandom, to a property that I would either marry on the spot, or take a bullet for. It’s the flag I wave proudly and it’s the movie that symbolizes what anime can be and what it once was and yet can still be again. It may not be to everyone’s liking, but I don’t care. It belongs to me and hopefully to you as well.