#81b : Space Warrior Baldios

For my original entry for Space Warrior Baldios, click here.

Sometimes you have to recover your tracks in order to move forward. In terms of classic anime and in particular, Space Warrior Baldios, I have a little more to say…

When I wrote the original entry for Space Warrior Baldios the only materials I had available were the first five episodes of the TV series, via fansub, and the film made from complied material with some revisioning. Then… I come to find out that the TV series would be released here in North America. Now I have an option to see Space Warrior Baldios in it’s entirety. I truly envy those of you who grew up in Europe during my youth, lets say approximately 1984 – 1990 as Baldios was available.

But one thing I have learned, never, but never ever be envious period. If you want something, be it an experience, a product, a relationship, whatever, give it space and focus. In time that something will happen, but don’t get too attached as that will sabotage your journey along the way. Persevering towards something eventually creates the greater payoff. Law of attraction? Wait a minute, this is a posting for my update on Space Warrior Baldios! Very true, let’s talk anime.

baltv_1The class of 1980 for TV mecha entries number about a handful, but I have seen two thus far to this writing. Last time I commented how Space Warrior Baldios and Space Runaway Ideon represented two of the most austere space opera robot shows to grace the small screens. I still agree with this, but after watching Baldios to completion I have to give an edge to Ideon. Baldios has it’s darker moments and elements and has a great twister of an ending, but Ideon went even deeper and I have to bow in respect as I love the dark (classic Yoshiyuki Tomino). But… but, I still I enjoyed Baldios. Ideon may be the more revolutionary show, but Baldios is for me, the evolutionary candidate.

baltv_2Ideon can be likened to the original Mobile Suit Gundam, or Zambot 3 as all three are attributed to Yoshiyuki Tomino. He has a well known style in his classic shows and he made mecha anime into a slowburn auteur exercise. Baldios on the other hand feels like the next step from the overall trend in mecha anime that was growing at the seams in the 1970s. It felt and partially looked like a show from about 1976/1977, but was created in 1980 (which honestly is not that far off). There is an element of innocence and fun that abounds in Baldios. Even the stock sequence for forming the three part Baldios robot harkens more to a 70s combination, GATTAI! Still Baldios has its moments of heaviness and drama as stated before, but the majority in terms of the overall plot of the TV series occurred more so in the beginning and ending of the episode run. Take Cowboy Bebop as a similar example.

baltv_3The in between episodes of Baldios showcase many of the minor plot elements of the characters such as reunions, unrequited loves, power struggles, trust issues and xenophobia as examples. Yet this TV series is sadly incomplete and truncated and in order to have the full story, you must watch the movie as well. Even with cancellation and necessity the one thing I can give respect to Baldios is the fact that the entirety of the story was eventually completed albeit in two forms of media. As classic mecha titles were my initial entry in anime, I am delighted to finally have the complete tale of Baldios under my belt. I shall wear Baldios like a medal with pride! Thank you time for teaching me to patiently wait all of these years to reap the greater reward.

#81 : Space Warrior Baldios

For an updated perspective on Space Warrior Baldios, click here.

Baldios_11980 was an interesting year for anime. On a personal note, I turned a year old, so I don’t have much personal memory. Only from researching and back cataloging through history, I found two of the most austere mecha space opera ever conceived. Space Runaway Ideon is the first, a show directed and created by Gundam’s Yoshiyuki Tomino (the year after Gundam to be precise) that took a mature stance dealing with themes of xenophobia and the awesome power of a collective conscious deity power. The second, and the subject of this entry, was Space Warrior Baldios, a tale about time travel, unrequited love, planetary destruction and pollution. Whoa… where have you been all my life Baldios?

Baldios_2I may forever have an incomplete appreciation of all that is Baldios. I have only come across the first five episodes of the 1980 TV series with an English translation. If I grew up in Europe this would be a different story. I know on the mainland, and in particular Italy, you had this on your TV screens back in the day. A compilation film would be released in 1981 and this is my only way, as of the moment, to enjoy the story as complete whole. Although… the TV series didn’t finish on a proper note anyway and the film actually gave a more finalized finality. Hmm… kind of like the Ideon films. I see a trend here? … The Baldios film is in my hands in two forms, the first being a fansub with the original Japanese dialogue and the second, a VHS release with an English dub by an early producer William James Ross. Definitely a treasured piece in my collection.

Another time, another place. The future and a heavily polluted planet known as S-1. Scientists work diligently to find a method to clean the pollution and restore this planet to it’s former glory. Enter our hero, Marin Reigan. After years of work his father, a top rate scientist, and his team have finally come to a solution. This does not go well with the military who become the higher authorities under the control of the totalitarian General Gatler. Gatler’s solution is to leave the planet and find new a colony. Marin’s father would fall victim to the rise of the military and in revenge Marin enacts revenge on his father’s murderer. That revenge killed a man who would put Marin into an interesting relationship with a beautiful female soldier. She is Aphrodia, or Afrodia, and her brother was the man Marin killed.

Baldios_3Once Gatler leaves S-1, Marin follows in pursuit in an awesome spaceship, the Pulsar Burn. In an odd twist of fate through traveling in null space (warping), Marin would end up appearing in front of our Earth in approximately the year 2100. Upon his arrival he is brought into question about who he is and if he has anything to do with Gatler’s army who is by now attacking the Earth. Soon he would gain the trust of the Earth’s military and scientists, including Dr. Ella Quinstein (such an awesome name). Marin’s Pulsar Burn would become part of a three part machine that unites to become the warrior robot Baldios to defend the Earth.

Baldios_4And this is only the beginning… Besides all the usual mecha space opera cliches we have to turn back to Aphrodia and her relationship with Marin. There’s is a fated and yet unrequited connection of love and hatred. How odd a couple can be so perfect and yet, so flawed. If anything this is the great draw of this show in how these two play off each other. Another draw of interest is the lack of children in the cast. Most mecha shows were of the shonen variety, so usually a character of a child, usually a boy, is included to say… this can be you in the story. In Baldios, we are in a hard and adult world. And finally, I have to mention the great twist of fate at the end; talk about a surprise ending. If you know how Baldios closes, you know one of the best endings in my honest opinion.

Baldios you are a rare bird in a sea of the usual in mecha and science fiction stereotypes. Space Warrior Baldios is dark and tackles issues that pertained to the world of 1980 and even still in 2018 (the writing of this entry). Should we allow war and hatred to destroy our relationships, our culture and ultimately the environment of the planet? A cautionary tale… a classic!