#25h : Robot Carnival : Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture: Westerner’s Invasion

This is one of nine entries that take an in depth look into each of the segments of the 1987 anime compilation Robot Carnival. For the original entry, click here.

RCh_1Now this is what I call a proper parody of the classic super robot genre with the stock and trade five member sentai team. Hiroyuki Kitakubo’s Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture: The Foreigner’s Invasion (also known as A Tale of Two Robots) could have been an episode for a full TV series, yet this is another specifically created segment for Robot Carnival. And forget about high technology, space, laser beams, or mythical magic as this is the early Meiji era, or the later quarter of the 19th century, so we are limited to coal, archaic electrical power, levers and pulleys and cannons (or fireworks!). Plus, a heavy dose of slapstick humor. And while several productions of Robot Carnival have a humorous bend to the story, Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture is straight up pure comedy gold.

RCh_2Ring the bells loud and clear as there is a strange machine arising inside a busy town. Commanded by a loose lipped wild eyed foreigner, this robot begins its invasion in earnest. Now who in their right mind could stop this behemoth? Enter five brave (and perhaps crazy?) youths who built a similar machine for an upcoming town festival. Although their robotic machine was not made for combat in any way, they give it all they can, fighting the good fight for both the pride of their hometown and all of Japan. Stuck in the middle are the rest of the town folk who watch in both awe and a little frustration as the town gets its fair share of damage. As the old saying goes… in order to make an omelette, you have to break a couple eggs.

Robot Carnival entry index:

  1. Opening
  2. Franken’s Gears
  3. Deprive
  4. Presence
  5. Starlight Angel
  6. Cloud
  7. Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture: Westerner’s Invasion
  8. Chicken Man and Red Neck
  9. Ending

#144 : Bubblegum Crisis

BGC_1The year of 2032… Mega Tokyo… hey what happened to regular Tokyo?… all hell has broken loose with these so called Boomers trashing the place. These androids are even too much for the illustrious AD Police, even with all their firepower and sophisticated technology. I demand to see how much of the tax revenue is being spent for this organization. We must therefore have a need for a third party to aid in this scenario. Welcome to the ’Hurricane’ world of the Knight Sabers. A world where a quartet of armored young women are the best answer for peace and justice. A world known simply as Bubblegum Crisis.

So Bubblegum Crisis… it’s like Blade Runner with both the action intensity and sexiness turned way up high. Plus, get extra hairspray as this is the 80s; tease that hair kidos! I guess if one is to make their own anime homage to a Blade Runner-like universe, one must do it very LOUD! Make is sexy! Drop all that film noir moodiness and introspection and let the action tell the story. And for good measure why not add in a little bit of The Terminator, Batman and Streets of Fire for good measure. Plus why not also spice things up with a little sentai squad action, wearable mechanical armor and good looking characters via Kenichi Sonoda. Hmm, explosions and attractive people with a dash of cyberpunk for good measure, now I see why this OVA gained some notoriety. For a time Bubblegum Crisis defined what anime was for many fans, but as we all know, anime is so much more than just well animated hi-octane action stories.

BGC_2OK just who are these Knight Sabers exactly? A lingerie store owner, a motorcycle obsessed rock singer, an aerobics instructor and a junior member of the AD Police make up our heroic quartet. Interesting… just shows you don’t really know people that well outside the office. While their day jobs are quite ordinary, the Knight Sabers crime fighting skills are anything but. With the aid of skin tight wearable armor that aids in performance, these girls can kick some serious butt. Seriously! Kind of like Saint Seiya with super high end technology that has a more fetish like approach that could rival the robot designs from say The Humanoid? With high heels too! Gatchaman may have thigh high boots, but the Knight Sabers have stilettos. And it is these spike heeled suits that do the best damage against the Genom Corporation’s never ending renegade Boomer population. The AD Police try their best, but they often have a better role as spectators. The fighting style that the Knight Sabers employs reminds me a lot of Casshan… come to think of it he had a streamlined body suit too. Holy cow, where are all these references to other anime coming from?

BGC_3Bubblegum Crisis is perhaps the biggest creation of the studio AIC. Built on the bedrock of Megazone 23 and two other Sonoda designed entries, Wannabies and Gall Force, Bubblegum Crisis is AIC at it’s height. Perhaps these three previous entries led the way like stepping stones towards Bubblegum Crisis? Who can say, but everything was right and in place to bring the Knight Sabers to the OVA market, which by 1987 was really in high gear. Bubblegum Crisis is in many ways an original creation that is an homage to so many pop culture references. Fans of sci-fi and anime making their own anime their way.

BGC_4I know Bubblegum Crisis is beloved by many established fans and everyday is introduced to new ones via whatever method you choose to watch. I will say I like it, but I don’t get all the hype. Maybe because this was one of the best options back in the day as it was easy to come by and it spoke towards certain demographics. I will admit it’s a classic, animated very well (almost seems like each episode is a mini movie; late 80s OVA quality!) and a nice example of cyberpunk as a genre. As a piece of action entertainment Bubblegum Crisis is stellar, but for me at least it starts to wear down particularly in the later episodes. Still, it is fun and has a rockin’ soundtrack, can’t complain about that!

#142 : Metal Skin Panic MADOX-01

M01_1If one is a fan of mecha, machinery, or action with the inclusion of a machine of some sort, then Metal Skin Panic MADOX-01 would be considered as close to porn for fans. Watch the opening scene with all the mechanics and electronics… it’s total mecha hentai, second to perhaps the credits of Patlabor 2. Only a mechanical designer would have created something like this OVA and in the case of MADOX-01 that is the truth. The name of Shinji Aramaki is all over the place… director, story creation and mechanical designer. I bet he was the caterer too? … Funny thing about MADOX-01, it reminds me of another OVA, I wonder what it could be? Though it’s not exactly the same it does remind me of… umm? Hmm? Let me think on this one…

M01_2The year, 1987. The place, Japan. The man,  Shinji Aramaki. The rise of the OVA format gave opportunities for many younger and/or junior rank members of the anime industry to take on the big role of directing a project. Names like Ichiro Itano, Koichi Ohata and Toshihiro Hirano went from special effects artists, mechanical designers, or character designers and moved into the realm of the director’s chair. Aramaki’s portfolio was filled with many mechanical designs ranging from anime including: Genesis Climber Mospeada, Megazone 23 (wait a minute!… oh never mind) and Bubblegum Crisis and western based shows like Pole Position, M.A.S.K. and even the original Transformers. Quite a nice lineup there so yes, he can draw machines very well… very well, but what about directing? I suppose its true to stick with your strengths and that is what Aramaki did with MADOX-01. A mechanical designer directing an anime all about mecha… what a surprise.

M01_3The Japanese government has a new fancy weapon, wearable armor in fact. Codenamed the MADOX-01 it showcases quite the firepower and agility. It’s pilot even defeats an old stalwart in more traditional equipment, much to his chagrin. Yeah old man, you lost to a girl! I always thought women were better mecha pilots anyway! 🙂 Later the machine needs to be transported to a new location and somehow becomes lost after an accident (shakes head). Can’t the government afford a decent security transport? Almost like in Black Magic M-66… keep track of your toys kids! Then this fancy device ends up in the hands of some nerdy engineering student who seems to understand how it works (hello Amuro Ray?) and then becomes connected with it literally. Now Mr. Smarty Student has to evade the feds, including that angry guy from before who wants revenge so bad for being beaten before (chuckles). Again a little like Megazone 23 with Shogo with the Garland and being chased by the military and gaining a rival with B.D. …

M01_4… Ah ha, it was Megazone 23 after all? Though I am stretching it a little, there are similarities if you take both OVAs from a certain point of view. Both stories want our protagonists to get back to their respective girlfriends at the end, but they have a minor issue of being wanted, as well as chased, from a larger authority. MADOX-01 is a far simpler story and is more based around the action than the unfolding mystery and drama of Megazone 23 (first installment to be specific). MADOX-01 is fun and has some unique character designs as well , but it is really a one and done sort of viewing. If you love mecha and action you will more than likely rewatch, while if you are more into shojo, or romance, I doubt you would consider it in the first place. I would highly recommend Megazone 23 in either case, just because it is a personal favorite and a far more superior production (my opinion). Either way they are both products of action powerhouse studio AIC!

By the way, in case you are interested in what came of Aramaki-san he continued on as a director years later. Remember the CGI movies of Appleseed and Space Pirate Captain Harlock? He was behind the chair on those films and they really left me flat… I couldn’t do fifteen minutes of either one. MADOX-01 is thankfully watchable, short and old style cel drawn too… mmm, I love the smell of analog in the morning.

#81b : Space Warrior Baldios

For my original entry for Space Warrior Baldios, click here.

Sometimes you have to recover your tracks in order to move forward. In terms of classic anime and in particular, Space Warrior Baldios, I have a little more to say…

When I wrote the original entry for Space Warrior Baldios the only materials I had available were the first five episodes of the TV series, via fansub, and the film made from complied material with some revisioning. Then… I come to find out that the TV series would be released here in North America. Now I have an option to see Space Warrior Baldios in it’s entirety. I truly envy those of you who grew up in Europe during my youth, lets say approximately 1984 – 1990 as Baldios was available.

But one thing I have learned, never, but never ever be envious period. If you want something, be it an experience, a product, a relationship, whatever, give it space and focus. In time that something will happen, but don’t get too attached as that will sabotage your journey along the way. Persevering towards something eventually creates the greater payoff. Law of attraction? Wait a minute, this is a posting for my update on Space Warrior Baldios! Very true, let’s talk anime.

baltv_1The class of 1980 for TV mecha entries number about a handful, but I have seen two thus far to this writing. Last time I commented how Space Warrior Baldios and Space Runaway Ideon represented two of the most austere space opera robot shows to grace the small screens. I still agree with this, but after watching Baldios to completion I have to give an edge to Ideon. Baldios has it’s darker moments and elements and has a great twister of an ending, but Ideon went even deeper and I have to bow in respect as I love the dark (classic Yoshiyuki Tomino). But… but, I still I enjoyed Baldios. Ideon may be the more revolutionary show, but Baldios is for me, the evolutionary candidate.

baltv_2Ideon can be likened to the original Mobile Suit Gundam, or Zambot 3 as all three are attributed to Yoshiyuki Tomino. He has a well known style in his classic shows and he made mecha anime into a slowburn auteur exercise. Baldios on the other hand feels like the next step from the overall trend in mecha anime that was growing at the seams in the 1970s. It felt and partially looked like a show from about 1976/1977, but was created in 1980 (which honestly is not that far off). There is an element of innocence and fun that abounds in Baldios. Even the stock sequence for forming the three part Baldios robot harkens more to a 70s combination, GATTAI! Still Baldios has its moments of heaviness and drama as stated before, but the majority in terms of the overall plot of the TV series occurred more so in the beginning and ending of the episode run. Take Cowboy Bebop as a similar example.

baltv_3The in between episodes of Baldios showcase many of the minor plot elements of the characters such as reunions, unrequited loves, power struggles, trust issues and xenophobia as examples. Yet this TV series is sadly incomplete and truncated and in order to have the full story, you must watch the movie as well. Even with cancellation and necessity the one thing I can give respect to Baldios is the fact that the entirety of the story was eventually completed albeit in two forms of media. As classic mecha titles were my initial entry in anime, I am delighted to finally have the complete tale of Baldios under my belt. I shall wear Baldios like a medal with pride! Thank you time for teaching me to patiently wait all of these years to reap the greater reward.

#1b : Megazone 23 (part 1)

For my original entry for Megazone 23 (part 1), click here.

Sometimes you have to recover your tracks in order to move forward. In terms of classic anime and in particular, the first part of Megazone 23, I have a little more to say…

m231_1This is like going all the way back to the beginning. Starting from scratch, the second time around. If you have been through this site before, I hope you have dug down enough to find the very first entry, Megazone 23 (part 1). If you are new here, then you found a great starting point. I have had for some time thought about revisiting this awesome OVA from 1985, but I like to keep only one entry per show, movie, or OVA. Know you know what this means… time to change some rules!

m231_2Have I changed my opinions much on this first Megazone 23 entry from last time. Not really. I still love it, I still hold it highly in my anime watching experience and it is an all in one package for what did get me into anime in the first place and what mostly keeps me digging up more classics. It has that certain something, perhaps its just love and devotion, I can’t say for sure. And if I could put the feeling into words, I would more than likely miss the point. The character designs from Toshihiro Hirano and Haruhiko Mikimoto may be the closest thing to words to express my feelings for Megazone 23. Such a good looking cast from two of my favorite artists.

m231_3Now, have you seen The Matrix? Do you make references, or hear them often from others, regarding society and the The Matrix? Now watch Megazone 23 and tell me if you can spot the similarities? Megazone 23 came out a good decade and change before The Matrix and in my opinion totally surpasses the live action trilogy. We have the story about a hero who finds that reality is in control of a computer program and basically reality is someone else’s fantasy and creation. And our hero finds out he is only a mere pawn in the big game and decides to rebel. Except in Megazone 23 you also have motorcycle styled mecha, a lone wolf antihero, brighter colors, a refreshing soundtrack, Flashdance styled dancing (with leg warmers) and it’s Japanese in origin. “Yeah Doc, all the best stuff is made in Japan.”  (Back to the Future strikes again) The next time someone mentions The Matrix just remember to recommend Megazone 23, or even better… shout out BAHAMUT 6!

Still I regard Megazone 23 the spiritual successor to my beloved Macross. I said it last time and I will say it again, Megazone 23 may not be Macross in name or story, but the main members who created both productions left a certain patina. Kind of like a band releasing two awesome albums in succession. I mentioned Hirano and Mikimoto earlier and there are other key figures, but the biggest was director Noboru Ishiguro. Such a professional, a gentleman and a renaissance man all rolled into one. Hayao Miyazaki, Yoshiyuki Tomino, Tomoharu Katsumata, Osamu Dezaki, Rintaro, Isao Takahata are all great directors and I love them dearly, but Ishiguro-sensei, if it was not for your work I may never have fallen in love with anime. Arigatou gozaimasu.

Bar none this is a title I still watch on a consistent basis. Repeatability is a major factor to anything great in media as there is always something new and still yet familiar to emjoy. The only question remains, ADV dub, Streamline dub, or the original Japanese track. All three have equal merit in their own way. Or, I can be adventurous and watch Robotech: The Movie. Wikipedia or Google that one if that is a title that does not ring a bell.

… and don’t forget you see a cameo of Lupin and Gigen (Lupin III) as… cops… ironic!

#119 : The Transformers: The Headmasters

Essentially this is a matter of deciding between A or B. 1987 would be a turning point and in way an ending for the original Transformers G1 storyline that began back in 1984. In the west we had The Rebirth, a three episode finale. Only three episodes to tie up everything and… and introduce another year’s toy line!? Hey Hasbro and Sunbow, way to go for being cheap! Now in Japan, Takara and Toei would create their own alternate series, The Headmasters, with a 35 episode length, which means more space for a story. Now that is more like it! My vote will be in favor of Japan on this one so this means it’s time to… Transform HEAD ON!!!

Warriors from deep space arrive during a climatic battle on Cybertron and in time, turn the tide for the everlasting war of The Transformers. The only thing is that these Transformers are not like others that have come before. They are two in number, one being the actual Transformer itself, of about human stature that transforms into a head that connects to a vehicle or animal that becomes the body… the Transtector to be more precise. A brand new concept for The Transformers, but a subtle variation of traditional mecha anime. This is for all intensive purposes a robot and it’s pilot, but with additional play mechanics for the toys. A brilliant idea! These are The Headmasters and this was their show as these characters, amongst others as well, slowly took over from the previous well known cast of heroes and villains.

And in style these previous generations of heroes go out in style. Fans demanded to have Optimus Prime back, but that architype had it’s day in the sun and in The Headmasters they let him heroically die again sacrificing himself for the greater whole. Blaster and Soundwave both die and resurrect into Twincast and Soundblaster, Ultra Magnus would fall sadly and Galvatron gets what is deserved for an evil tyrant. Rodimus and Kup voluntarily retire… WHAT!? But don’t fret we get to keep Wheelie and Daniel and Arcee becomes an almost surrogate babysitter to these two (now thats just not right boss). … Well now, I have to take back that all our old favorites part ways for the best pastures.

Now as for this new cast of Headmaster characters (say hey to Chromedome and Cerebros/Fortress), the Headmasters show delivers one key important feature over the Rebirth… mythology. The concept of a group of smaller Transformers retreating from Cybertron to land onto a strange planet (named… Master) to begin a new life is a little more interesting than just combining with humans on a whim. Survival becomes the order of the day and the creation of the Transtector body helps to turn the tide for these miniature Autobots and Decepticons. A revolution that sparks an evolution.

I often find criticism towards the The Headmasters questionable. When I first watched this series I had a little of a knee jerk reaction as The Headmasters follows a more traditional Japanese shonen adventure pattern. At the time it would seem to be sacrilege to view the Transformers with different sensibilities toward plot and particularly humor. Yet I still found this show very entertaining, but a recent rewatch helped to reopen my curiosity. Having familiarity towards anime in general will lessen this blow, but I know some folks who have watched this show are strict diehard Transformers fans and not into anime. The ideal would be to be a fan of both as you get the best of both worlds! … And yes the Omni production English dub that floats around is quite laughable in it’s interpretation, but don’t let that stop you from following through with this series. Give it a try with the original Japanese track and subs and then decide.

The beauty of The Headmasters is that it opens up an alternative view. If you want to finish off the classic G1 Transformers you can stick with The Rebirth trilogy, but you would be missing out on another point of view. I began this posting by saying this is a choice between A or B. A… B… ah well, which one? Or perhaps why choose at all, have both! Because in the end this is not so much choosing an option… more like having the official album and the sought after bootleg at the same time. Thank you Japan, Toei and Takara for The Headmaster… “Transform Dash!”

 

#114 : Space Runaway Ideon

Space. The universe itself is vast and beyond scope. Space opera as a genre is also larger than life, but often you can hold it in the palm of your hand. Themes and characters are bigger than life, but still relatable on some level. What if space opera could represent something even bigger than just off hand spaceship battles, or fun times trekking through the deep vastness of the beautiful great void. Can space opera encompass the function and consequences of the living universe, call it ‘God’ perhaps, depending on the actions you and your civilization make? After finalizing Mobile Suit Gundam, Yoshiyuki Tomino and Sunrise would gives us an answer in 1980 with Space Runaway Ideon.

Ideon_1Space Runaway Ideon may be the most epic and most importantly, the most sublime sci-fi epic in existence within the realm of Japanese animation. Gundam is one thing, Legend of Galactic Heroes is another, but Ideon is it’s own animal. Ideon ventures into unique territory in terms of emotion, intensity and characterization. Known often as a series where everyone and everything dies (Kill ’em all Tomino!), the true meaning of this series is so much more. The death and sacrifices are all consequences and actions of conflict and hatred. This of course is a product of ignorance and xenophobia to an extreme that once the negativity reaches a certain point, the only option left is total and complete destruction.

Ideon_2Even with all this seriousness one must remember that Space Runaway Ideon is first and foremost a mecha show. And what a giant robot indeed (105 meters/344.5 feet for a height), the Ideon is imposing beyond belief and is one of two mechs that literally scare the $h!& out of me (the other being Giant Robo). This is not so much for the overall size or power, but more so on the presence a mecha exudes. It’s about total respect. All this from what looks like a mix of a Gundam’s GM and Gun Cannon added together on a heavy dose of steroids. Literally… as this is a robot that can split a planet in half. This is power beyond power, almost ‘God’ like, hence why I give the Ideon such respect.

Ideon_3Beyond the drama and the Ideon robot itself, Space Runaway Ideon like many of the best mecha shows is about the relationships of it’s cast. And like many Tomino shows, this cast is large. Our story concerns two factions that make contact on a planet in the Andromeda galaxy. Earth based humans like us have begun colonization on the planet which they call Solo. Beyond the colonization, many of the scientists and researchers have discovered several artifacts from a past civilization including three huge truck like vehicles and a buried spaceship. The second faction known as the Buff Clan (yes that is their name) are on a mission to locate the legendary power of the Ide. They come upon this same planet, which they call Logo Dau and eventually both civilizations meet. In response, both sides start a conflict showing the darkest side of human interaction towards someone or something that is unfamiliar, or different.

Sadly Space Runaway Ideon would be become a victim of cancelization, most likely due to a lack of ratings not unlike the previous year’s Mobile Suit Gundam. This left several holes in the plot and a rushed ending. All the build up of 38 episodes led to an ackward final 39th. Yet the story was not over for in 1982 two movies would be released to finish the story properly. The Ideon: A Contact would act as a review and prequel to the awesome and powerful The Ideon: Be Invoked. I highly recommend both movies if you want to get the whole story of Ideon.

Ideon_4To conclude with Space Runaway Ideon, let us examine a quote by Albert Einstein… “The most important decision we make is whether we believe we live in a friendly or hostile universe.” If that decision in the end is a hostile one, there is nowhere to go except toward ultimate destruction… think about it. This applies not only to anime space opera, but also our lives as well. Similar to, but not the same as Evangelion, Ideon addresses the power of how we sometimes view our environment and ourselves and what happens in regards to how we react toward it. Space Runaway Ideon was and still is a show beyond any experience I have known and I will always count it as one of my all-time favorites.