#67 : The Door into Summer

DiS_1The line between childhood and adulthood can be very arbitrary, if it even exists at all. Physically growing is one thing, but the emotional and psychological circumstances are often the more pronounced to us no matter the age. Sometimes we are ready for growth and other times it smacks on us so hard in surprise that it leaves us in a state of shock. Coming of age stories in anime are many in number with several being dramatic… no… melodramatic. And then there is this 1981 hour long movie that defines, redefines and then turns everything I once knew into a soap opera beyond description. One of my all time favorites, The Door into Summer (Natsu e no Tobira).

To be honest The Door into Summer is much like a guilty pleasure for me. And it shouldn’t be so much, but this production has hot sexual hormones written all over it. And not in the way of being pornographic as The Door into Summer is very sensual in it’s eroticism and yet very dangerous at the same time. Like those naughty romance novels you can’t put down, because each new page is getting to a better part than before. The openness of sexuality is quite an eye opener for 1981, yet… Japan has always been a little more honest about sexuality told in any art form, even though they are known for being a more reserved culture.

DiS_2When begin ironically at an ending, always a great way to start a movie, where we see two boys looking to duel each other the old fashioned way with pistols over the love of a girl. The protagonist, Marion, rushes in to stop this senseless act and asking what has happened this summer break. From here we learn that we are in France in the 1840s as we go back to the beginning of the summer where Marion is left alone at his school residence hall with his school friends due to the fact his mother would rather be with her new husband that her only son. Marion is known as a supposed king of ‘cool’ by being the most rational in his group of friends. After all he stops a fight between two boys who are fighting over a girl that actually loves Marion. In the process, he enters a chicken competition with one of these boys by standing on railroad tracks and waiting for the next train to arrive. Very bold indeed.

DiS_3Upon beginning the movie I began by scratching my head as to the character designs. The Door into Summer is definitely a shojo manga adaptation, but these eyes, these face shapes… who penned these original designs? Then a familiar name came into my lap from some light research… the name of Keiko Takamiya. Ah yes, the original creator of Toward the Terra and Andromeda Stories, this is the answer. And as a shojo in general, the designs in this movie are very, very pretty. Kind of like Rose of Versailles injected with all the best of bishonen of perhaps Saint Seiya. Add to this the fact this was produced by Studio Madhouse showed another level of quality. For me Madhouse equals the creme of the crop and the line work, color and pastel like backgrounds add an ambience that are beyond verbal description.

DiS_4Returning to the aspect of sexuality, it is hard to believe, but during this film we see encounters of jealous suitors in love with the popular girl, a naughty older woman seducing young Marion and a glimpse into one of the boy’s unrequited homosexual desires unfold. Marion has to come to terms with all of this happening around him and with his own sense of self worth and his repressed desires for sexual intimacy. Definitely not a lightweight and thankfully so. Did I ever have a summer like this… not even close. It is entertainment after all, but still these yearnings are the back of all our minds. That feeling of getting down and dirty so to speak, with consent of course.

The Door into Summer is so hot you may get burned… and I bet you’ll watch it again every time you get the chance.

 

#54 : Neo-Tokyo

Short collections are always welcome in my world. Anime often becomes a system of stereotypes… Shonen fighters, magical girls, mecha, Ghibli films. All are great, but is this all that there is to Japanese anime? And of course the answer is absolutely not. There is always something of an alternative. Something more artsy, a little bizarre and uniquely it’s own thing. Art for arts sake and without compromise. A true hallmark of that awesome studio known as Madhouse, welcome to the trilogy Manie-Manie Labyrinth Tales, better known here in the west as Neo-Tokyo.

NT_1We begin with my personal favorite, The Labyrinth. Directed by Rintaro, this a feast of visual delight. Rintaro has always been known for being excessive with visuals to the point that what you are watching becomes more important that the story itself. The story is simple here, an imaginative girl who while playing with her lost and found cat gets sucked into a surreal psychedelic ‘labyrinth’ that leads to a circus via a clock. It just goes to show, watch the invitation you receive from Pierrot-type clowns around grandfather styled clocks. I don’t know if this segment has a meaning or point and I don’t care. It’s pure Rintaro and often when I watch his work I just want to bask in it like a painting in a museum. Plus having the music of Erik Satie is a plus for me 🙂

NT_2The second part known as The Running Man is perhaps the most recognized of the trilogy. I believe this had some play on MTV back in the day and it was in the promotional material of Streamline Pictures. This film looks and feels like its creator, Yoshiyaki Kawajiri. He is best known for a lot of seinen action, think Ninja Scroll, but you cannot deny his talent as a character designer. Top notch, meticulous detail exudes in this tale about a reporter who has followed an unbeatable professional racer throughout his career. How has this man survived for so long in this dangerous sport and how long will he last at the top? The action is fast paced, but the sections where it feel that time or movement slows to a grinding halt is where the real drama begins.

NT_3Now to the final segment, I present Construction Cancelation Order. I can sum this one up with one name, Katsuhiro Otomo. It’s Mr. Akira essentially and yes this is a tale where the societal conditions have gone wrong, except this one has a bit more humor. A nerdy salaryman inspector is to visit a construction site in the remote region of South America to essentially shut it down. And that is a tall order as the machines have total control of the situation. And even though the site is in effect falling apart at the seams and abandoned, the worker robots still continue as programmed. Can our faithful inspector do anything to stop this insanity, or is their a way to just get out alive? This reminds me a lot of Otomo’s later work Roujin Z where he shows how letting technology thrive to solve our everyday problem without a safety net can bring disaster and a chuckle or two.

Hold on… we are going back to the first segment again to finish off as a sort of coda. The labyrinth doors closes… The end. Lets gives a round of applause for our three directors everyone.

NT_4So… what does this trilogy of shorts have to do with a title like Neo-Tokyo? Honestly, I can’t see one, except… except that it was most likely borrowed from that contemporary hit film, Akira. As stated, Akira was a license to print money here in the west back in the early 1990s and it’s creator and director Katsuhiro Otomo was associated with the film right off the bat. I am sure the consensus was… we need to find more work that features this guy to cash in on this Akira trend. And of course Neo-Tokyo was prime for the taking as there was not much else out at the time that had Otomo’s name as director on it. Too bad this film is nothing like Akira and that is neither good, nor bad.

A distant cousin to another all time favorite of mine, the beautiful Robot Carnival, Neo-Tokyo is for me darker and perhaps more streamlined. Helmed by three of Japan’s best directors and produced at Madhouse, Neo-Tokyo stands as one of the best examples of how far Japan stretched animation in the 1980s. I often have forgotten about how unique this one was in the past, but that is true no more.