#106 : Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors

JWW_1Cue that magnificent rocking intro one more time… also turn up the volume and get ready to PARTY! Animated cartoons based on original toy lines were a plenty during the 1980s and sometimes those shows had more notoriety than the toys themselves. The Wheeled Warriors toy line by Mattel had really fun dynamics by changing out parts and included little pilots. But… no real story or backdrop was included as all these pilots were just generic as the sea is wet. How does one create a show from generic characters alone? You drop that concept in favor for something else, THATS HOW! Lets join the Lightning League, our hero Jayce and one of my favorite shows for both nostalgia and current viewing pleasure… OMG it’s time to share my fandom for Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors.

JWW_2How ironic that the love of this show came from repeated viewing of only one episode I had taped off of TV way back when (who still has their VCR recording skills?). YES, only one episode of Jayce lit a fire in me and made me a fan. That episode by the way was #15, Bloodstone. I hoped beyond hope that someday I would see the show in it’s entirety. Then came various DVD releases, first a disc with four episodes, then a single release with the first half of the show and then finally… all 65 over two sets. So my wish came true, but how did the selling point of a singular half hour turn out over the long haul of episode watching? Quite well, but like many shows in this caliber it just meanders around and does not finalize into a big ending. Even the five episode ‘Liberty Stone’ saga is kind of piecemeal. Yet I love riding around the universe with this show and certain episodes do rise to the top as great sci-fi adventures and stories to be enjoyed. And after seeing certain earlier DiC properties that came out before Jayce, I began to understand that this show was more that just a happy accident.

JWW_3I often wonder how the origins of the characters came to be in Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors? After years of watching loads of pop culture you could say, yeah this show was totally ripping off Star Wars. Perhaps, but I think there is another theory and it all stems from the original creation staff at DiC. This show took the Mattel toy line and added elements from two of their earlier shows, Ulysses 31 and Mysterious Cities of Gold (my theory). Jayce could be a hybrid of Ulysses and Esteban in the form of a young man of about 17, Oon is Nono, Flora is a mix of Yumi and Zia (and could be an awesome magical girl possibility). Herc is Mendoza painted to look like Han Solo and Gillian is the grandfather you wish you had mixed with Obiwan Kenobi and Merlin. And then there is Brock… a giant fish… that sounds like a dog’s squeeky toy or a chirping bird… I love the imagination of cartoons. But that is your basic hero cast, a great way to recycle old ideas with a fresh concept. As for the baddies, most are just for show and the filling of space, but Saw Boss… that is one powerful and scary voice, that is so professional as well?

LWW_4If you are a true hard corps 80s cartoon nut, you appreciate this show and even know that it existed in the first place. Having a great group of actors, several writers including sci-fi legend J. Michael Straczynski and a classic Shuki Levy soundtrack (one of his best from my ears) adds to the credibility of this show. Jayce is one of the prime examples of 80s cartoons that look close enough to native Japanese product, while being a total western creation. I miss the days that Japanese studios did the animation for shows in the west and as an example watch the opening sequence again, it so could pass as an ‘anime’ opening. Do you agree? Yet why I truly love this show is because it is one of my cartoon versions of comfort food and in particular when I am needing a friend or a pick me up when I am under the weather, I always return to Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors. It’s that simple… “Keep on Rollin’”.

#103 : Horus: Prince of the Sun

Horus_1I often wonder, was Horus: Prince of the Sun ‘born under a bad sign’? Many circumstances attempted to derail this early gem of the modern era of Japanese animation. It went over budget, it took more time to finish and even the parent animation company of Toei and it’s producers wanted to shelf this film. Why? This film had and even still has so much potential; it took chances and sounded a battlecry for a new generation of animators. And there in lies the answer as Horus: Prince of the Sun attempted to break free of the conservative standards of the day by telling a different story in both concept and direction. The results of this would honor Horus with critical notoriety over the years as one of the crowning achievements of the 1960s.

Horus_2By 1968 Isao Takahata had become a solid veteran in the animation industry and gained a reputation as a leader of those younger up and coming members of the industry in the 1960s. With both TV and film work of various degrees under his belt there was one achievement that this young man had left to fulfill and that was to direct a feature film. This opportunity came, but at a price. As mentioned before from the start this movie had some nasty karma associated with it. Producers at Toei, money and time all had a hand in stopping this film, but Takahata with his quiet demeanor and steadfast approach to being a director made sure that this film would get made, finished and then released.

The major controversy of this film can be traced into the story itself. The Norse mythology and look that was used was nothing more than a cover for another story that existed underneath. Japan’s native population, the Ainu, had for generations been looked down upon yet their culture was rich and diverse. A new generation wanted to adapt a traditional tale of the Ainu and present a more serious subject matter to give animation a more mature option. Both progress and change are a part of civilization and this new generation of artists and animators wanted to be at the vanguard of this movement. This was the 1960s after all and be it America, Europe, or Japan, the youth of the period were questioning and protesting against the rules and the establishment of their day.

Horus_3The story is a quintessential tale of the ‘Hero’s Journey’ (all hail Joseph Campbell) where our young hero Horus, sometimes translated to Hols, must integrate into the greater whole of civilization. This is a common theme I find in Takahata’s work and both sides of the extreme can be seen in Grave of the Fireflies (going against society and/or being ignored by society) on one end of the spectrum and Pom Poko (the community coming together for a common concern) on the other. Horus soon settles into a town and becomes a local hero after conquering a giant pike (fish) that prevented fish from being a food source to the local people. Soon afterwards he meets a wayward girl, Hilda, with a mysterious and unknown past and a large, very large, chip on her shoulder. Hilda is quite a complex character and her relationship with Horus is complicated and becomes a key element for the plot of the story as the film progresses forward.

Horus_4Horus: Prince of the Sun not only took more seriously the storytelling, but also on a technical level, the animation itself. This film amongst other examples of the era raised the standard of the quality of Japan’s output. Disney was the standard and Horus: Prince of the Sun is on par with the quality of the venerated classic Disney films. In certain aspects it excels, in particular with the action sequences with the pike fight and the final showdown. Of course Japan has always had an edge (my opinion) in regards to action and the movement and fluidity required to make those sequences work.

This is a film that has taken a few views on my part to fully appreciate the greatness to what Horus: Prince of the Sun truly is. Due to the issues with the production of the film it has it’s own way of unfolding the plot, which took me a little getting used to, but once I understood the whole of the scope of this film I came to love this movie. It’s classic Takahata and I recommend you to watch this one at least once to see where anime once was, where anime was going and see where this film has left it’s influence today.

… on a personal note, I dedicate this posting to the memory of Isao Takahata who passed away recently. Thank you good sir for your work and I for one will never forget the stories you shared with us all.

Isao Takahata
Oct 29, 1935 – Apr. 5, 2018

#98 : Urusei Yatsura 2: Beautiful Dreamer

UY2_1Imagine living in your own dream world; anything goes! This is your ultimate utopia and if you apply any boundaries, they are of your own choosing. Who would be in this dream world with you? What would you do together? Once upon a time there was a property by the name of Urusei Yatsura that during the 1980s was one of the hottest tickets around. This show (and the manga) put Rumiko Takahashi on the map and brought a young director by the name of Mamoru Oshii into the spotlight. Before Ghost in the Shell, Patlabor and even Angel’s Egg, Oshii would showcase his signature style for the first time in Urusei Yatsura 2: Beautiful Dreamer. 

UY2_2The year was 1984 and going to the cinema was the thing to do for an otaku. I consider 1984, the anime Summer of Love. The Macross crew would release Macross: Do You Remember Love and Hayao Miyazaki wowed audiences with Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind. Mamoru Oshii, who at the time was the director of all that was Urusei Yatsura, followed the script so to speak… and then a second film with Ataru, Lum and crew allowed Oshii’s individual style that we know so well to blossom for the first time. With both writing and directing duties, Oshii would bring his contribution of Beautiful Dreamer into the class of 1984. Oshii’s dreamworlds began to be a part of our worlds.

UY2_3I will be the first to admit that I may not be the best reference for Urusei Yatsura. I have seen the first handful of episodes and have a general idea of the plot and all the hijinks  including the lecherous main character, Ataru, and his jealous love interest/who happens to be an alien Lum. You know Lum (I hope)? The bikini clad girl with the horns on her head… a timeless design. Now, what I am familiar with is Mamoru Oshii’s artistry which he uses tastefully in Beautiful Dreamer. He adds elements of surreal imagery and circumstances and completely bends the rules to what you consider a particular property to be. Think Patlabor 2 in regards to Patlabor as a whole, or perhaps the Ghost in the Shell film in regards to the original manga. He puts his philosophical and symbolic spin into action that only Oshii does so well. Like a skilled painter, his style is his own. And where Patlabor 2 and Ghost in the Shell can get very heavy into drama, being that this is a film is in the Urusei Yatsura universewe still retain the comedy and dynamism. Mamoru Oshii brilliant with fun and comedy? Oh definitely YES! 🙂

The plot begins with a school festival where everyone is pitching in with their own contributions, decorations and such. Many of the usual cast are putting together a cafe of sorts, which includes a tank in the middle of their particular classroom. Wait, a tank?! How did they get that upstairs? Anyway… events seem as if things are repeating themselves as various characters start to see that the reality of their surroundings keeps moving in a loop. If you travel, you end up back at the same spot and occasionally you lose contact with others. Just what is happening here? Eventually the entire world turns into a ghost town… on the back of a… turtle (it ties in with traditional Japanese mythology)? The only normality is the Moroboshi house, which becomes the safe haven for our cast since there is a constant supply of food, water and electricity for some reason. I’ll say it again, just what is going on here?

UY2_4Not being completely up to par with the Urusei Yatsura universe, I will be the first to say that I did not have much trouble following the film. Watching Beautiful Dreamer purely as an Oshii film worked well enough for me! There has been a Blu Ray release recently here in North America, but my viewing of this film came from a recent VHS find.  … Oh whatever has happened to you, oh great Urusei Yatsura? Rumiko Takahashi’s other work, Maison Ikkoku, Ranma and Inuyasha have all eclipsed this once behemoth property. Yet Urusei Yatsura you still live on be it YV series or movie adaptation in our memories… and even perhaps, our dreams…

#94 : Rainbow Brite

RB_1Magical girls are not mutually exclusive to Japan alone. After all the influence of the original magical girl Sally the Witch was based off of the character Samantha Stevens from the popular 1960s TV show Bewitched. But what if the west could create a property that pays homage to Japan’s homage to something that was in the west previously? Or, is it more like the Hallmark Card company gave a toy concept to the production company DiC and they thought, hey we can make her a magical girl? It doesn’t matter how it all happened, the only thing that matters is that it’s time to talk about a legend among legends. Miss Rainbow Brite herself… Hip Hip Hooray!

RB_2Before I begin I will be the first to say that Rainbow Brite is not officially an anime, but she belongs here at CAM. First she was created during the 1980s (1983 for the toys and 1984 for the first animated installment). Two, Rainbow Brite, at least according to Wikipedia, was broadcast in Japan as well as the west. Three, the preproduction was all American and French via DiC, but the heavy lifting, being the drawings and animation, was completely Japanese in origin via TMS (Tokyo Movie Shinsa). And not just TMS the company, but one of their best directors (and one of my all time favorites), Osamu Dezaki, worked on the show. Though this show looks nothing like Dezaki’s signature style. And four… number four… I love Rainbow Brite and since I am the boss here, the verdict stands. After all I need some more color and happiness around here. …and more 80s cartoons as well for nostalgia and to prove that my generation had awesome entertainment. 🙂

RB_3The premise is very simple… a little girl named Wisp is cast into a world of darkness and  meets up with various friends (the Color Kids and Sprites), a “magnificent horse, the glory of the galaxy” (Starlight’s got some confidence) and the powerful color belt to spread joy, happiness and color all over Rainbowland and our world as well. Together they hold back the naughtiness of the ill-behaved Murky and his second in command Lurky (HEY MURKY!!) by halting their plans of bringing gloom and darkness into the world. Can’t we all just get along here? This is yet another simple story of duality where our hero takes on an antagonist and triumphs in the end. Except we have it all in nice full color; I mean you would expect nothing less from a show titled Rainbow Brite? I think so. That and being a product of the 1980s, a colorful decade in more ways than one, expect nothing less.

RB_4So here is a fun exercise, in what ways does western Rainbow Brite differ to other magical girls of Japanese origin? Perhaps the biggest and most obvious, is the fact that Rainbow herself does not transform from a mundane identity. She is all who she is and lives in the wonders of Rainbowland and not in our world as some average middle, or high school girl. Therefore, she does not have the typical magic wand which aids in the transformation process. Rainbow has her fingers, loads of star sprinkles and the previously mentioned color belt as tools for her magic. As a character Rainbow is almost a mediatory between the later (1990s) hero type of magical girl, like Sailor Moon, and the contemporary (1980s) idol good girls of Creamy Mami and Minky Momo. What of these differences in the grand scheme of things? I say they are welcome!

Now here is a question… why only 13 episodes of content? I believe the initial episodes were more geared for direct to video while the later filled out a run for Saturday morning broadcast. Still, Rainbow Brite had possibilites here. Yet why cry over what did not happen and celebrate what did come to fruition instead. After all, Rainbow wants us all to have a great day. Actually, that should be more like… A GREAT DAY!

#78 : Saint Seiya: The Movies

Saint Seiya, oh how I love thee, let me count the ways… I can forgive many of the short comings of Saint Seiya. In essence, it is a run of the mill shonen fighter, but the inclusion of Greek mythology, astrology and heavy melodrama make it a heavy favorite for me. The original TV series I love dearly, the manga was great, the Hades Arc OVAs which finished the original manga adaptation was welcomed. A couple years ago, the company Discotek released a bunch of SS materials. I bought a few of these DVDs and here is what came of that purchase.

SS_M_1I will only make comment on the four SS films that were released from 1987 to 1989. All of these were released by Discotek and fall into my blog’s concentration on anime of the 1970s and 1980s. Several other productions would appear decades later, but these four titles will be under the spotlight: Evil Goddess Eris (1987), The Heated Battle of the Gods (1988), Legend of Crimson Youth (1988) and Warriors of the Final Holy Battle (1989). All four are out of canon to the original manga and ironically The Heated Battle of the Gods is an alternative to the filler Asgard Arc from the TV series. These films are more for fun and I am sure were created to keep the SS marketing machine going.

SS_M_2All four movies are very cliche and are so formulaic that I end up predicting the whole plot before the beginning credits. Though each film has it’s own pace and variation on the so called theme, or leitmotif of the fightype formula of successive adversaries leading up to, they all kind of go like this… A great arch enemy descends and brings five subordinates. In the process Saori/Athena either gets kidnapped, or wooed away (if this enemy is oh so charming and handsome). Then our five Bronze Saints begin there quest to save their sacred leader. Usually Pegasus Seiya goes first and then gets that crap kicked out of him, but defeats the adversary. Next comes Cygnus Hyoga and the process repeats and then we get to Dragon Shiryu. He as well falls after a great fight, but Shiryu ends up having his cloth removed because we all have to witness his owe so muscular chest. Seriously, watch any SS and this always happen.

SS_M_3Next we get a double feature with Andromeda Shun, the ‘cute’ one who is more of a pacifist, also falls victim to his adversary. And that is when Shun’s brother Phoenix Ikki shows up and says, “Yo, you be messin’ with my brother? I’m gonna mess you up good!” Then Ikki puts the smack down. Seriously, always bailing out your younger brother. When will Shun learn to take care of himself? Later, Athena falls into further peril and all five of the boys, though being deeply beaten, trek towards the final showdown to take down the big bad enemy. All five boys take a stand one at a time and then like a miracle of the heavens, the Sagittarius Gold Cloth appears. Of course it chooses Seiya every time and all the boys cry out “Seiya, Seiya” and after that… Seiya reborn to perfection and full of strength draws the bow to shoot the golden arrow to save the day. Then all is happy ever after. …you can’t make this all up?

SS_M_4Of the four films, three are 45 minute shorts so it makes sense that they are not the most deep in regards for plot. You are cramming a supposed arc into less than an hour! The third film, Legend of Crimson Youth, which is over an hour long, has a plot that bends the predictive formula and has a bit more drama and… is my favorite of the four. Plus, in this film, we see the resurrection and inclusion of the five Gold Saints who fell during the Sanctuary Arc of the TV series: Gemini Saga, Cancer Deathmask, Capricorn Shura, Aquarius Camus and Pisces Aphrodite. Gold Saints forever!, they add to the plot greatly. This was also a film which celebrated the 20th anniversary of SS’s parent publisher, Shonen Jump.

So in final, I would watch these one at a time and… Nothing is ever a substitute for that original Sanctuary arc of the TV series 🙂 These are, as mentioned earlier, sideline stories that are not a part of the original plot so take these for what you will.

#75 : Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind

Mention the name Hayao Miyazaki today and you will be told he is the king of the world in regards to anime. Now imagine mentioning Hayao Miyazaki’s name in the spring of 1984 and the otaku world would say that this guy is the new rocket in town and he has his sights set on the stars and the infinite beyond. The film adaptation of his manga, Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind, did more than move the masses and set the ground work for the future of Studio Ghibli. Miyazaki would present us with one of cinema’s greatest and most honorable heroes.

Nau_1Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind cemented Hayao Miyazaki into super stardom and led to the formation of Studio Ghibli. He had been in the anime business for almost a couple decades by this point, but this one film changed everything overnight. So am I saying that Nausicaa is that powerful? That this is a film that can change destiny? Uh huh! And why is this? Two reasons. One, Nausicaa grounded fantasy and sci-fi so to speak (as did Fist of the North Star, also 1984). This is not about spaceships, or laser blasters. It’s about our Earth’s environment, the aftermath of great devastation and the corruption of those who don’t work in accord with their natural environment and within themselves. Which to be honest, is one and the same; as above so below. But more importantly, it’s about the heart. Miyazaki can pull your heart strings like few others and Nausicaa represents a spirit more often needed in anime or entertainment in general. This movie was ready at the right time.

Nau_2Now… what about our hero, Miss Nausicaa? How can you not love her? She is a role model for everyone who has a way with animals, an understanding of nature and a love of flight and freedom (so Miyazaki). Her powers can tame the wildest of beasts, build a garden from what many consider poisonous plants and fly a glider like a bird. Yet she is vulnerable as well because she is surrounded by factions that want to shake her standing on what she believes in and what is right to her. Despite these controversies she holds her ground and stays honest to herself and she knows how to get her hands dirty when needed. A princess and yet a tomboy who follows her heart… so noble. She would be the first in a line of strong female characters that Miyazaki would bless us with. Kiki (Kiki’s Delivery Service), San (Princess Mononoke) and Chihiro (Spirited Away) are all representative of the Miyazaki heroine archetype.

Nau_3Miyazaki has always been the showman compared to his partner in crime, Isao Takahata. Yet when Miyazaki goes into a more serious direction, he does not slouch. Even at this early stage of his career, he still showed the ultra professionalism that oozes from his work. This was a time where fame and fortune was just around the corner and he was hungry to prove himself as an auteur and while he did direct the awesome Castle of Cagliostro, Nausicaa would be his first total vision. But he needed help and various names are linked with this film. Takahata produced, a young Joe Hisashi provided the epic score (which reminds me of his then current work on Mospeada and Birth) and Hideaki Anno, years before his time at Gainax, would be a key animator during one of the climactic scenes (I am not saying which one 😉 ).

Nau_4Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind is more than just another anime title, or even one of Miyazaki’s best films, it is required viewing. You call yourself a fan of anime? Let me see that you have seen this movie? Yeah I figured you have 🙂 as my readers have good taste. A timeless classic worthy to be in any collection, unless it is the Warriors of the Wind release (I have never seen that one). To Hayao Miyazaki, I thank you for making this movie that has made generations of fans cheer, cry and believe in a greater good. While many productions in the 1980s mark the times that they were made in, few can be considered eternal classics. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind is and always will be a permanent classic.

#72 : Fairy Princess Minky Momo: La Ronde in my Dream

LRinD_1Fairy Princess Minky Momo, the TV series, is one of those backlog shows that I have been wanting to see for quite a while. Alas, I have only come across the first episode with English subtitles up to the writing of this review, but the follow up OVA of 1985, La Ronda in My Dream, is easier to obtain. So I suppose I will start my foray into Minky Mono-land with this production. This reminds me in a way to GoShogun, a mecha series from 1981, where my only exposure has been to the Goshogun: The Movie (a recap) and GoShogun: The Time Etranger (one of my all time favorite anime). And the irony, in two points, both shows are from the studio Ashi Production and the main female protagonists (Minky Momo and Remy Shimada in Goshogun) are voiced by Mami Koyama (again a favorite). Could be coincidence, but maybe not?

LRinD_2The story begins by giving an overall plot overview, which then cuts into a concert that Minky’s parents are attending. She of course is backstage helping perhaps one of the performers, or even a patron’s pet cat (Minky Momo and family have a pet shop and vet clinic). The promoter soon rushes in to announce that the main star of the show will not be appearing and Minky Momo has an idea and tells him she knows somebody. Now since this is a magical girl show, it’s time to reveal Minky Momo’s transformational powers. She can turn from her usual 10 year old self (I am guessing her age) into a variety of heroic versions of herself (kind of like Cutie Honey), but at about the age of say 18-19. So the star of tonight’s show will be none other than Minky Momo herself, though no one really knows her secret (well except her three animal friends). And much like the magical girls of Studio Pierrot, Minky Momo is now a musical idol, if only for this song.

LRinD_3The musical number was a hit and now comes the drawing for a couple’s vacation to the South Pole. How romantic, more like ironic (too cold for romance, but then again you can be close to each other for warmth?). And low and behold, Minky Momo’s parents win! What a surprise, so it’s time to pack up because our magical girl is going to have the house to herself. PARTY!!! But wait… when all seems to be going good, except you burnt your breakfast Momo, the TV announces that the plane with Momo’s parent had crashed over an island that has been having some weird issues as of late. In no time, Momo and her animal crew get into the Gourmet Pop (car and trailer combo that can FLY!) and head out to find what has happened. So begins the fun! Just be ready to meet an island of children and their leader… Peter Pan! And no Captain Hook or Tinkerbell, fyi.

LRinD_4Interesting is that this OVA was brought over to the west eons ago from Harmony Gold (yes they did more than Robotech) and known as Gigi and the Fountain of Youth. It’s a solid adaptation, but in terms of the 80s I am sure Gigi would have gotten lost to bigger names like Care Bears, My Little Pony, or Rainbow Brite on this end of the world. I never heard of this version until recently, but I am sure some of you out there may have had this on VHS. And speaking of Rainbow Brite, Minky Momo reminds me of the star sprinkle carrying cherub faced creation of the Hallmark Company. Both girls try to spread joy and happiness and use magic and though they are a little different, they are both welcome to help me on a tough day. The 80s, bright colors and magical girls… I miss my early youth.

I want a slice of fun with an accent on the cute; I get my cake and I eat it too! Minky Momo, girl, you need more presence, more love, more in general. After all, you brought the magical girl genre into the 1980s and along with the likes of Creamy Mami, evolved it into a more modern context well before the behemoth of Sailor Moon. Ms. Momo, you will always have my deepest respect and La Ronde in my Dream is an honorable and solid title needed for any collection.