#25j : Robot Carnival : Closing

This is one of nine entries that take an in depth look into each of the segments of the 1987 anime compilation Robot Carnival. For the original entry, click here.

RCj_1The time has come as the show is over and as much as the anime Robot Carnival has to come to an end, the behemoth vehicle of destructive entertainment, Robot Carnival, also has to find a place to retire. The second bookend to the Robot Carnival anthology begins with the ever awesome machine giving everything it has to climb a sand dune with all it’s shear power. In the process of straining the engines beyond their limits, the once mighty Robot Carnival destroys itself in a blaze of glory. The end, peace in the land at last as the mighty beast has fallen… yet it’s not quite over. Katsuhiro Otomo still has a little more to tell, but first the credits so everyone can get their name in lights.

Now for the encore… with the destruction of Robot Carnival there is much in the way of debris. Some of it is quite appealing like a shining gem in the dirt, so thinks a traveling nomad who picks up a metallic sphere to give to his children. Once home they all stare in amazement at this ball as it opens to reveal a beautiful doll of a dancing ballerina. Hold on, have we seen this before? BOOM! Yup, that’s what I thought. Until next time… “That’s all folks!”

Robot Carnival entry index:

  1. Opening
  2. Franken’s Gears
  3. Deprive
  4. Presence
  5. Starlight Angel
  6. Cloud
  7. Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture: Westerner’s Invasion
  8. Chicken Man and Red Neck
  9. Ending

#25i : Robot Carnival : Chicken Man and Red Neck

This is one of nine entries that take an in depth look into each of the segments of the 1987 anime compilation Robot Carnival. For the original entry, click here.

Something’s lurking in the streets tonight. Almost like the dead rising from their graves, except this time round it’s machinery and raw building materials being drawn up from a superior power and taking on their own lives. And it was such a quiet pleasant day just a couple minutes ago. Enter the world of Chicken Man and Red Neck. An odd title for a comedic action horror anime, does Japan know what we in the U.S. refer to as a redneck?Streamline Pictures renaming to Nightmare was a good solution when the film came out here in the west way back in the 1990s. The original title refers to the two main characters, one a robotic spirit who looks like a hooded scarecrow and the other a salaryman with a long neck and rubbery movements who is just running scared.

RCi_1And I can’t say I blame him. Imagine waking up seeing all kinds of odd robotic type monsters walking all over and invading your home of Tokyo feeling like there is absolutely no escape. You gotta run! Director Takashi Nakamura has cited the Bald Mountain sequence from Fantasia as an inspiration, but I also see Chicken Man and Red Neck more in line with another classic from Disney, their telling of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow from The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad. An endless chase that can only resolve itself from the rays of the morning sun. How typical, even spirit infested robots seem not to like the glory of solar exposure. Perhaps an allergy to vitamin D?

Robot Carnival entry index:

  1. Opening
  2. Franken’s Gears
  3. Deprive
  4. Presence
  5. Starlight Angel
  6. Cloud
  7. Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture: Westerner’s Invasion
  8. Chicken Man and Red Neck
  9. Ending

#25h : Robot Carnival : Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture: Westerner’s Invasion

This is one of nine entries that take an in depth look into each of the segments of the 1987 anime compilation Robot Carnival. For the original entry, click here.

RCh_1Now this is what I call a proper parody of the classic super robot genre with the stock and trade five member sentai team. Hiroyuki Kitakubo’s Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture: The Foreigner’s Invasion (also known as A Tale of Two Robots) could have been an episode for a full TV series, yet this is another specifically created segment for Robot Carnival. And forget about high technology, space, laser beams, or mythical magic as this is the early Meiji era, or the later quarter of the 19th century, so we are limited to coal, archaic electrical power, levers and pulleys and cannons (or fireworks!). Plus, a heavy dose of slapstick humor. And while several productions of Robot Carnival have a humorous bend to the story, Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture is straight up pure comedy gold.

RCh_2Ring the bells loud and clear as there is a strange machine arising inside a busy town. Commanded by a loose lipped wild eyed foreigner, this robot begins its invasion in earnest. Now who in their right mind could stop this behemoth? Enter five brave (and perhaps crazy?) youths who built a similar machine for an upcoming town festival. Although their robotic machine was not made for combat in any way, they give it all they can, fighting the good fight for both the pride of their hometown and all of Japan. Stuck in the middle are the rest of the town folk who watch in both awe and a little frustration as the town gets its fair share of damage. As the old saying goes… in order to make an omelette, you have to break a couple eggs.

Robot Carnival entry index:

  1. Opening
  2. Franken’s Gears
  3. Deprive
  4. Presence
  5. Starlight Angel
  6. Cloud
  7. Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture: Westerner’s Invasion
  8. Chicken Man and Red Neck
  9. Ending

#25c : Robot Carnival : Franken’s Gears

This is one of nine entries that take an in depth look into each of the segments of the 1987 anime compilation Robot Carnival. For the original entry, click here.

Much of the segments of Robot Carnival don’t feature any perceivable dialogue. The 1980s was the era of the music video and many of Robot Carnival films could fit this description, but in regards to Franken’s Gears, let’s go back to the beginning of cinema itself. The Silent Era to be precise when motion, setting and even background music were key elements to tell the story instead of the spoken word. Franken’s Gears feel’s like one of those ‘old time’ movies with both the exaggerated gestures and the more sepia toned color palette. And also lets add in some German Expressionism too with exaggerated lighting as well for good measure.

RCc_1The primary influence had to have been the classic Shelley story of Frankenstein… it’s all in the title, Franken’s Gears. Our mad scientist, who looks like Doc Brown from Back of the Future, is making a mechanical creation that he wishes to bring to life. Same story for the most part as the Shelley story except this time round we get the visual genius Koji Morimoto to tell an alternate version. Amidst a nasty thunderstorm and within a laboratory of wild electricity flashing all around the big robot that lies horizontal begins to move. The mad scientist is all in glee. IT’S ALIVE! IT’S ALIVE! It’s a miracle and even though the mechanical hodge podge is not much to look at, it rises and begins to take in it’s surroundings including our scientist. All seems to be in perfect harmony except Mr. Scientist, did you check to make sure that this robot is stable and it’s weight is evenly distributed? Uh oh…

Robot Carnival entry index:

  1. Opening
  2. Franken’s Gears
  3. Deprive
  4. Presence
  5. Starlight Angel
  6. Cloud
  7. Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture: Westerner’s Invasion
  8. Chicken Man and Red Neck
  9. Ending

#25b : Robot Carnival : Opening

This is one of nine entries that take an in depth look into each of the segments of the 1987 anime compilation Robot Carnival. For the original entry, click here.

A poster fragment has blown onto my legs, so I had to give it a look. Robot Carnival coming soon… let’s read this again… Robot Carnival coming… Uh oh! Better tell mom, dad, the rest of town. HEY EVERYONE! (run run run run and add some generic cartoony sounds) Hey everyone look, LOOK! The Robot Carnival is coming. All the adults look and grumble, hmm hmm… and then a rumble from the ground begins to get stronger and stronger. Oh oh! Better run a hide in the houses.

RCb_1Can mass destruction be comedic? Kind of a sick twisted sense of humor, but what do you expect from the guy who created Akira (Katsuhiro Otomo)? What if a Looney Tunes cartoon, perhaps one with the Tasmanian Devil, is turned up to a point beyond insanity? Welcome to the opening section of Robot Carnival. In the case of the intro, a massive vehicle treads over the land spreading music, happiness and folly that is mixed with ruinous damage. Look fireworks, eh more like missiles. And over there floating doll like ballerinas… more like bombs. Better to be safe and hide because in all likelihood I bet the population of the town that Robot Carnival is “visiting” has been here before. Could this have been a great entertainment spectacle from the past that has over time broken down and become a little corrupt? Could this have been created by some mad scientist or ego maniac? Who can say because the five minutes is up and we have to move along.

On with the show!…

Robot Carnival entry index:

  1. Opening
  2. Franken’s Gears
  3. Deprive
  4. Presence
  5. Starlight Angel
  6. Cloud
  7. Strange Tales of Meiji Machine Culture: Westerner’s Invasion
  8. Chicken Man and Red Neck
  9. Ending

#148 : Call Me Tonight

CMT_1It’s Friday night (or maybe Tuesday morning?), I have nothing to do at the present moment. Hey I have this business card for a hotline to call in case one gets “bored”. Its one of those party lines… like a 900 number to call for “a good time.” (LOL) We can have a laugh, right? Anything is worth a try at least once, right? ANYWAY!… the service is so namely called Telephone Communications Madonna (maybe a reference to the famous pop star, this is an 80s OVA after all, insert a little pop culture for good measure). … Well folks, I choose not to call this time round (yes I am chicken), but I can tell you a story about a young man who did call that was quite out of the ordinary. Here is the tale of Call Me Tonight.

CMT_2This young man’s name is Ryo and he is insistent to get in touch with whoever is in charge of Telephone Communications Madonna. A girl named Rumi, who initially goes under an alias, is the head of this party line and is “the one” that Ryo is searching for. Good thinking on the alias since safety as a precaution is always smart. Ryo’s request for help in the mean time is at first odd and may just be some offhand creepy caller… SPAM ALERT… but don’t worry folks he is a sweet and genuine guy with a very disturbing issue. Now here is Ryo’s problem, every time he gets turned on or masturbates he becomes an animal literally. No literally… his clothes rip to shreds and his body changes and becomes more monster like than human. Poor boy here has one heck of a sex drive. Kind of similar to the Incredible Hulk, but instead of rage it’s all his hormones that are all out of whack. Almost as if he is possessed?… I may have spoiled the plot… nah, not too much. Rumi agrees to help and meets Ryo and the rest I leave up to you as you finish this OVA.

CMT_3Call Me Tonight could at first be dismissed as an erotic horror fantasy, or perhaps soft porn (I wouldn’t go that far) from what is described, but it is for what it is, a decent, entertaining and slightly endearing romantic production. It’s a fun horror OVA, a little bizarre. Just take everything with a grain of salt and think of Call Me Tonight more in line to what I theorize it may, or may not be about. Some of us have issues with intimacy and relationships, or perhaps how we feel about our bodies and the awkwardness that was, or perhaps is if you are of age, puberty. Call Me Tonight is like an over the top horror version of those times in our lives where we feel a little out of place bodily and sexually insecure. Leave it to oddball, rare, or forgotten anime to tell a story like this. But this is my theory, it may have some other meaning, but I am sticking with my guns on this one.

… and would you believe, Call Me Tonight has a happy ending too! So if you feel uncomfortable about yourself, reach out to someone because you often find help, support and even love when you set your insecurities, or demons, free. It worked in a short one off OVA title so that says something. Right? Yeah!!!… anime saves the day again!

#147 : Animated Classics of Japanese Literature

ACoJL_1Never judge a book by it’s cover… same goes for anything else that is packaged. Advertisers can sell you anything, so long as the branding is attractive to you. Sometimes the plainest of outer shells contain the richest and most profound inner contents; true beauty at it’s best. Let’s recap about books again for a moment, literature if you will. One of the best ways one can look at a culture is to examine the stories that they tell. These tales give the personal experiences, feelings and outlook of those who choose to write it all down and express. Anime often times gets big and over the top and strives for something newer, brighter, more exciting, etc. But what of the classic literary tales of Japan, don’t they deserve a voice as well? Of course they do and with Animated Classics of Japanese Literature you can have your cake and eat it too without ever reading a line of text.

… Of course if you don’t speak, or comprehend Japanese, you will more than likely be reading subtitles for Animated Classics of Japanese Literature, or any other anime unless you have, or choose the route of a dub in your native language. So in the end watching anime can be like reading a book… sort of. Don’t you feel smarter knowing you watch cartoons? No matter which way you slice it, you are going to be reading. …

ACoJL_2On it’s original release, Animated Classics of Japanese Literature went by another name. Sumitomo Life Insurance Youth Anime Complete Collection is the proper title as seen in Japan. The naming that I am familiar with and using in this entry, was used on the DVDs I found from the old Central Park Media catalog. An odd choice for that company back in the day, but I for one am glad that this was part of their repertoire. Similar to another Nippon Animation production, World Masterpiece Theater (Nippon animated both productions by the way), Animated Classics of Japanese Literature would translate native Japanese stories instead of the Western classics more familiar to the previous. Obviously! Except in the case of Animated Classics of Japanese Literature, these would be pocket sized entries as each episode, or two, or three, was a self contained story instead of the longer drawn out full series format. Hence we have an emphasis on the format of the short story rather than the longer novel.

ACoJL_3Even to this day I have yet to see the complete series. The long out of print DVDs released here in the U.S. only cover a dozen of the 34 total episodes. And if I remember correctly, a few more episodes were also available on VHS. With only about one third of the series under my belt I can safely give a proper analysis due to the overarching format being an omnibus collection of smaller stories. This is not for the usual otaku type searching for magical girls or giant robots. These are mundane stories, very plain and mostly ordinary. Many are very dramatic, or at times comedic, depending on the source. As a fan of World Masterpiece Theater this was a no brainer for myself as I enjoy seeing literary classics come to life from my favorite visual medium of animation. As a lover of Eastern culture and philosophy, I welcomed these stories into my home like a traveling friend. As I have grown up in the west, all of these tales are completely foreign to my native experience and serve as an appetizer to introduce me to more of Japan’s literary history. Many of these episodes were memorable, but I always seem to remember The Harp of Burma most fondly.

To finish off, let’s go back to the beginning… never judge a book by it’s cover. Animated Classics of Japanese Literature may not win awards for glorious designs or high end animation. Animated Classics of Japanese Literature is also, in many cases, not what we gravitate towards our choosing of anime subject matter. These are mostly common everyday stories, similar to many of the books we read in school, or choose to now, that pertain to our cultural definition. Often times these stories have lasting value and even with a more budget appearance, their golden centers still shine.