#192 : Farewell Space Battleship Yamato: In the Name of Love / Arrivederci Yamato

Certain anime we all fall in love with instantaneously and many titles leave us with an emotional bind that we will never forget. We jump for joy and many times shed tears watching those we love on screen go through hardship. Years ago when I was on my Space Battleship Yamato fix I would eventually come across the films of the original epic franchise that was perhaps the first otakufest of obsession in the world of anime. Their was a certain idealism in the late 1970 and 1980s and it is written all over Yamato, but at one time that idealism almost died and actually was planned as the finality. The initial sequel, Farewell Space Battleship Yamato: In the Name of Love (Arrivederci Yamato), is a large epic that defines space opera tragedy and is one of the most beautiful movies in the genre that also leaves you in tears.

FSBY_1After the success of the 1977 rebooted film version of the first Yamato series the combined power of Yoshinobu Nishizaki and Leiji Matsumoto would strike out again to create a followup that was bigger than the first and for the time a finality. Seamless would be the transition as we followup one year after Earth’s victory against the Gamilas Empire, which also cooresponds with Farewell Space Battleship Yamato’s release dat of 1978. The artwork is a little more polished this second time around and Matusmoto’s character designs and deep emotional idealism injected into the story are ever present again. Fandom was high for Yamato in the late 1970s, how would they respond to this followup film?

FSBY_2This new story of Farewell Space Battleship Yamato is a lot of redo from before, but in many ways it does not matter. A peaceful Earth that is under the threat of alien invasion to destroy humanity, the meeting of an angelic feminine goddess archetype who has a message for the people of Earth and the trials and tribulations of a converted WWII battleship that can navigate the openness of outer space is all familiar territory from the first Yamato story. Familiar faces like Godai, Yuki and the rest of the Yamato crew are back this time with a new captain, Hijikata, and a group of space Marines led by the likable Saito. And let us not forget our new enemy this time round, the Comet Empire, or the Gatlantis Empire, who also have in their service a familiar face. Remember Dessler, Yamato I’s chief villain? He’s alive and has one of the best redemption moments I have ever seen in all of anime. Dessler was in the end an honorable man.

FSBY_3Massively long, two and a half hours of clock time span this is a behemoth of a film and yet it’s the climactic last half hour where the epic of tragedy of watching our beloved friends, the crew of the Yamato, one by one fall to save humanity from the Comet Empire’s invasion. Personal sacrifices of those who give all that they have and give their lives for something greater than what is expected from society are true heroes. My eyes are never dry through this whole time and while some of the crew does survive, it does come at the expense of the beautiful Yamato herself. Many of us are told who to look up to in regards for the heroic, but real heroes are usually never recognized except by our own experience. I will never forget the crew of the Yamato.

FSBY_4Often I question which is my favorite story in the original Yamato franchise? This film is often at the top of the listing along with the alternate TV series retelling, Yamato II. Yamato I also ranks very high, but this film’s epic tragedy, which can be compared to other great films like Grave of the Fireflies and my beloved Windaria, are moments in time that have stuck with me like no other. Farewell Space Battleship Yamato: In the Name of Love is not considered proper canon anymore since the retelling as Yamato II, yet I consider this film one of the prize jewels of what Yamato once was and one of the best anime of the 1970s. … “Free at last, they took you life, they could not take your pride. In the Name of Love…”