#109 : The Transformers: The Movie

TF_movie_1Years before maturity and discovering talented filmmakers in the line of Stanley Kubrick and Ingmar Bergman, there was the seven, or perhaps eight year old version of me that was in love with what I considered… The Greatest Movie Ever Made! The Transformers was the hottest cartoon on TV and one of the hottest toys of the mid 1980s, but all of this fails in comparison to the awe, wonder and larger than life spectacle of the generically named The Transformers: The Movie. How do I feel about this movie after thirty plus years of watching… well, it’s not the greatest movie ever made, but it is still an important stepping stone and a fun experience.

TF_movie_2No matter what anyone says about The Transformers: The Movie, I admit the plot is cheesy, the characterization is generic and you can even say that it was a cheap ploy to dump the previous year’s line from toy shelves. But… you can’t deny that this film is gorgeous to look at. Vibrant colors, fluid motion and excellent drawing exudes quality. Right? Watch that introduction again with Unicron attacking the planet and tell me what you think. The TV show looked pretty good, but this film is, visually, a masterpiece. Of course it was animated at Toei and funded by Hasbro, so that is a good combination. In fact for the release date of 1986, it was a nicer looking film than the Fist of the North Star film… come on Toei, what about the local community? I suppose the American dollars from Hasbro helped… most likely.

TF_movie_3I see no reason in going over the plot as it is the simple Autobots vs. Decepticons fare, except with a new cast of characters voiced by many a famous name at the time. Does anyone remember Judd Nelson or Robert Stack? But the standout moments for me include Hot Rod/Rodimus Prime’s ascension to Autobot leadership, Megatron’s metamorphosis into Galvatron (so well animated), the introduction of the Quintessons and “Bah weep granah weep nini bong.” “Don’t worry they’ll reciprocate.” Of course the big issue of this movie was the fact that characters died… brutally. Why is is that here in the west we have to hide death and impermanence from children? After all, we would be a greater society if we wouldn’t hide this stuff under the rug. STOP TELLING LIES TO CHILDREN!

TF_movie_4Now did I cry over Optimus Prime’s death? Not that I remember, but I did feel loss. I even then accepted the fact that the great leader had to sacrifice for a newer generation. I for one have nothing against Hot Rod for jumping in to help out, and some fans don’t like Roddy, but I really do like the kid… one of my all time favorite Transformers in fact (I see a bit of me in him). Optimus would have the most heroic of heroic deaths and went out with honesty and integrity, unlike his some of his fellow Autobots like Ironhide, who groveled for mercy, or Prowl, who belted out smoke and fire (yowzers). Yet nothing compares to the death of the king of backstabbers, Starscream. Perhaps one of the best characters ever in The Transformers, Starscream would get his just desserts in perhaps the most violent shooting I have ever witnessed. “Will anyone else attempt to fill his shoes?”

What I find ironic about this movie and even to a small extent the original G1 totality, is how much it is not recognized in the general popular culture. The Transformers are now known the world over in the guise of various re-imaginations. Every generation has ‘their’ show or movie to call ‘their’ own. But what of the original source material? Much like other subjects, you can never really know the whole truth unless you go all the way back to the beginning. Perhaps I am just settled in my ways as an old G1 fan. Still with any franchise or knowledge for that matter, you have to dig into the past to find true perspective in anything.

TF_movie_5In the end I have seen The Transformers: The Movie more times than I care to count. I am sure I will watch it again, but due to ingrained repetitions, I can recite the entire film blindfolded and with plugged ears… maybe. It is generic, slightly dated and fodder for a lot of nostalgia for some of us, but in the end again… it is a great film to look at. Hand drawn animation at one of it’s finest hours and a fun flick to share with friends, some popcorn and maybe even show a tear at times. It was the cornerstone of my childhood and a long lasting influence that exists into the present. The Transformers: The Movie still has ‘the touch‘ 🙂

“Till All Are One”

#106 : Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors

JWW_1Cue that magnificent rocking intro one more time… also turn up the volume and get ready to PARTY! Animated cartoons based on original toy lines were a plenty during the 1980s and sometimes those shows had more notoriety than the toys themselves. The Wheeled Warriors toy line by Mattel had really fun dynamics by changing out parts and included little pilots. But… no real story or backdrop was included as all these pilots were just generic as the sea is wet. How does one create a show from generic characters alone? You drop that concept in favor for something else, THATS HOW! Lets join the Lightning League, our hero Jayce and one of my favorite shows for both nostalgia and current viewing pleasure… OMG it’s time to share my fandom for Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors.

JWW_2How ironic that the love of this show came from repeated viewing of only one episode I had taped off of TV way back when (who still has their VCR recording skills?). YES, only one episode of Jayce lit a fire in me and made me a fan. That episode by the way was #15, Bloodstone. I hoped beyond hope that someday I would see the show in it’s entirety. Then came various DVD releases, first a disc with four episodes, then a single release with the first half of the show and then finally… all 65 over two sets. So my wish came true, but how did the selling point of a singular half hour turn out over the long haul of episode watching? Quite well, but like many shows in this caliber it just meanders around and does not finalize into a big ending. Even the five episode ‘Liberty Stone’ saga is kind of piecemeal. Yet I love riding around the universe with this show and certain episodes do rise to the top as great sci-fi adventures and stories to be enjoyed. And after seeing certain earlier DiC properties that came out before Jayce, I began to understand that this show was more that just a happy accident.

JWW_3I often wonder how the origins of the characters came to be in Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors? After years of watching loads of pop culture you could say, yeah this show was totally ripping off Star Wars. Perhaps, but I think there is another theory and it all stems from the original creation staff at DiC. This show took the Mattel toy line and added elements from two of their earlier shows, Ulysses 31 and Mysterious Cities of Gold (my theory). Jayce could be a hybrid of Ulysses and Esteban in the form of a young man of about 17, Oon is Nono, Flora is a mix of Yumi and Zia (and could be an awesome magical girl possibility). Herc is Mendoza painted to look like Han Solo and Gillian is the grandfather you wish you had mixed with Obiwan Kenobi and Merlin. And then there is Brock… a giant fish… that sounds like a dog’s squeeky toy or a chirping bird… I love the imagination of cartoons. But that is your basic hero cast, a great way to recycle old ideas with a fresh concept. As for the baddies, most are just for show and the filling of space, but Saw Boss… that is one powerful and scary voice, that is so professional as well?

LWW_4If you are a true hard corps 80s cartoon nut, you appreciate this show and even know that it existed in the first place. Having a great group of actors, several writers including sci-fi legend J. Michael Straczynski and a classic Shuki Levy soundtrack (one of his best from my ears) adds to the credibility of this show. Jayce is one of the prime examples of 80s cartoons that look close enough to native Japanese product, while being a total western creation. I miss the days that Japanese studios did the animation for shows in the west and as an example watch the opening sequence again, it so could pass as an ‘anime’ opening. Do you agree? Yet why I truly love this show is because it is one of my cartoon versions of comfort food and in particular when I am needing a friend or a pick me up when I am under the weather, I always return to Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors. It’s that simple… “Keep on Rollin’”.

#94 : Rainbow Brite

RB_1Magical girls are not mutually exclusive to Japan alone. After all the influence of the original magical girl Sally the Witch was based off of the character Samantha Stevens from the popular 1960s TV show Bewitched. But what if the west could create a property that pays homage to Japan’s homage to something that was in the west previously? Or, is it more like the Hallmark Card company gave a toy concept to the production company DiC and they thought, hey we can make her a magical girl? It doesn’t matter how it all happened, the only thing that matters is that it’s time to talk about a legend among legends. Miss Rainbow Brite herself… Hip Hip Hooray!

RB_2Before I begin I will be the first to say that Rainbow Brite is not officially an anime, but she belongs here at CAM. First she was created during the 1980s (1983 for the toys and 1984 for the first animated installment). Two, Rainbow Brite, at least according to Wikipedia, was broadcast in Japan as well as the west. Three, the preproduction was all American and French via DiC, but the heavy lifting, being the drawings and animation, was completely Japanese in origin via TMS (Tokyo Movie Shinsa). And not just TMS the company, but one of their best directors (and one of my all time favorites), Osamu Dezaki, worked on the show. Though this show looks nothing like Dezaki’s signature style. And four… number four… I love Rainbow Brite and since I am the boss here, the verdict stands. After all I need some more color and happiness around here. …and more 80s cartoons as well for nostalgia and to prove that my generation had awesome entertainment. 🙂

RB_3The premise is very simple… a little girl named Wisp is cast into a world of darkness and  meets up with various friends (the Color Kids and Sprites), a “magnificent horse, the glory of the galaxy” (Starlight’s got some confidence) and the powerful color belt to spread joy, happiness and color all over Rainbowland and our world as well. Together they hold back the naughtiness of the ill-behaved Murky and his second in command Lurky (HEY MURKY!!) by halting their plans of bringing gloom and darkness into the world. Can’t we all just get along here? This is yet another simple story of duality where our hero takes on an antagonist and triumphs in the end. Except we have it all in nice full color; I mean you would expect nothing less from a show titled Rainbow Brite? I think so. That and being a product of the 1980s, a colorful decade in more ways than one, expect nothing less.

RB_4So here is a fun exercise, in what ways does western Rainbow Brite differ to other magical girls of Japanese origin? Perhaps the biggest and most obvious, is the fact that Rainbow herself does not transform from a mundane identity. She is all who she is and lives in the wonders of Rainbowland and not in our world as some average middle, or high school girl. Therefore, she does not have the typical magic wand which aids in the transformation process. Rainbow has her fingers, loads of star sprinkles and the previously mentioned color belt as tools for her magic. As a character Rainbow is almost a mediatory between the later (1990s) hero type of magical girl, like Sailor Moon, and the contemporary (1980s) idol good girls of Creamy Mami and Minky Momo. What of these differences in the grand scheme of things? I say they are welcome!

Now here is a question… why only 13 episodes of content? I believe the initial episodes were more geared for direct to video while the later filled out a run for Saturday morning broadcast. Still, Rainbow Brite had possibilites here. Yet why cry over what did not happen and celebrate what did come to fruition instead. After all, Rainbow wants us all to have a great day. Actually, that should be more like… A GREAT DAY!

#83 : The Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers

Space western… isn’t that kind of oxymoronic. But if steampunk works, then space westerns do as well. Outlaws, cowboys, the wild frontier and spaceships with warp drives are a killer combination. The time has come to highlight some animated shows that are one foot in Japan and the other in the west. I have one of my favorites of that bygone era that competed with Filmation’s Bravestarr and Saber Ryder and the Star Sheriffs (an adaptation of Star Musketeer Bismarck) for the definition of an 80s cartoon space western. That show is The Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers.

GR_1Though not an anime outright since this series was conceptualized and sold to the west, it can be what I call an example of a half-anime or perhaps a second cousin once removed. Galaxy Rangers was a collaboration with the awesome Tokyo Movie Shinsa (TMS) studio via American producer Robert Mandell. Mandell’s vision was to create a western infused space opera that appealed to a more mature audience, mix it with the elements of anime he liked while working in Japan and do it all without an already existing merchandise license. Sounds par for the course today, but in 1986 this was a new frontier. The economy of that time allowed the west to use Japan’s studios for production often in animation, but collaborations were rare. This was the ‘Wild West’ so to speak (how fitting).

GR_2I could mention much about the plot of Galaxy Rangers, but I should introduce our quartet of heroes and how they fit into the show. First we have the leader, Zachary Foxx, the straight man and also the father and husband who has a mission to rescue his family back from the Crown Empire. Shane Gooseman, a former Supertrooper (kind of like the X-Men or Cyborg 009), is the bad-boy of the group. Niko, the token pretty girl, has brilliant intuition, knowledge of archeology and gorgeous hair. And finally ‘Doc’ Walter Hartford, the essential computer geek. All four work as a collective unit, or separately, on various jobs requiring their help. So kind of like a sentai squad like Gatchaman crossed with the Dirty Pair.

GR_3Now… Galaxy Rangers, what makes you so special? How do you rock our universe? How about the music for a start! We have no synth pop or cheesy songs on this soundtrack. We get arena hair-band hard rock. WHOA! Last time I jammed this hard was Transformers: The Movie. And what about influences from Japan? The character designs and colors are closer to ‘anime’ of the time. In fact Shane Gooseman resembles M.D. Geist from my eye, though he takes after a blonde Clint Eastwood to be honest. Zachary Foxx has an arm that acts like a laser blaster, very similar to a space pirate named Cobra. Plus, how many cartoons featured the late TV and Broadway actor Jerry Orbach? OK, on research I found he was also in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast as well, but to me he will always be Zachary Foxx. Finally I have to give a nod to Speed Racer: Peter Fernandez worked on production and Corinne Orr played the Queen of the Crown.

GR_4Now being that I was a bright eyed and bushy tailed seven year old in 1986, I bet you thought I saw this show everyday after school. Well… I had no knowledge of this show back then. Very true indeed as my watch list that year was Transformers, Silverhawks, Robotech and at times Jem. It wasn’t until about 2011/12 and finding a review of the DVD sets that an itch began to arise that needed a scratch. How did I not know about this show at the time? Again I remind myself that as a kid cowboys and westerns were not my cup of tea, plus I never heard any classmates talk about it. If you remember, I mentioned that this show began without any merchandising. So their was no alternative way to get your interest to see this show. But like anything, time will cross the paths of destiny in whatever schedule is set before it.

While most 65 episode 80s shows of my youth can often be stained with nostalgia perfection, upon viewing with more mature eyes apparent flaws are often present. If you isolate the best 26 or so episodes of Galaxy Rangers when the show was running on all cylinders, you have a solid production; a fine hybrid. Rangers are Forever!