#104 : Aim for the Ace (movie)

AftA_movie1I often find that the older I get, an interest in professional sports and following a team, or such, is not something to aspire towards. Yet I respect sport and competition and my love for anime is strong, if only there were anime about sports… oh, yeah there IS! And LOTS of them too. There are several I have enjoyed and are quite good as well. And then there are entries that are legendary, hall of famers so to speak. Aim for the Ace is part of that higher echelon of sports legends. As I make my way through the original 1973 Aim for the Ace TV series I had to stop and take a break to revisit the cinema version of 1979.

AftA_movie2The influence of this movie is epic and goes well beyond the sport of tennis and sports anime itself. I am sure Studio Gainax and a young Hideaki Anno loved this story because Aim for the Ace is written all over Gainax’s first OVA release and Anno’s directorial debut Aim for the Top! Gunbuster. The name totally gives away the influence, but also the story in and of itself is a close facsimile except tennis was swapped out for a sci-fi world with mechs. Still in both stories the concept of aiming to be your best! And not just the best in your own frame of reference, but also to your fellow peers and most importantly, to a mentor who sees more potential in you than you see in yourself. It’s a type of story that never gets old because don’t we all need a reminder to pick ourselves up and try again if we stumble?

AftA_movie3Aim for the Ace’s story begins with it’s starry eyed protagonist Hiromi Oka, a new student at Nishi High School. She and her best friend Maki join the illustrious and highly noted tennis club and soon she has her eyes on two particular individuals. The first being the all-star of the girl’s varsity team, the amazingly talented, most beautiful and girl with perhaps the best hair in all of anime (seriously where do you get all that volume and curls?), Reika Ryuzaki better known as Ochoufujin (Madame Butterfly, so fitting). The second is Nishi’s new coach, Jin Munakata, a former champion, who is a tough yet fair mentor whose presence brings out a little fear and sweat. His first objective is to test the team, to see which of the hundred or so members are most fit to play on the school’s varsity squad. Hiromi is still very much a rookie and when her time comes to test her skills, she connects with one ball that impresses the coach in more ways than one. So much so that she lands a spot on the varsity team… wha, say what? Now the drama, no, more like soap opera begins!

AftA_movie4While watching the original TV series concurrently with this film, I could not help but notice the jump in animation quality and complexity. The fluidity of the film is a quantum leap from the TV series and could be down to a number of factors. First, the idea that you go from TV to movie is obvious since there is often a budget increase. The second is the six year gap between TV to the movie. This second reason is a strong point to a theory I have about how the 1970s is perhaps the most important decade in all of Japanese animation. Stories grew into more sophistication, many traditions and cliches settled themselves during this time and drawing and animation began to mature and become more complex. Such an awesome decade and Aim for the Ace is a great example of the growth of anime during this era. Ah to be born in the ‘70s… wait I was born then… 1979 no less… so that means I am the same age as this movie… interesting!

Now for the final wrap up… Aim for the Ace, is based on a great shojo manga (check!), was made at the awesome Tokyo Movie Shinsha (check!), was directed by the creative and artistic Osamu Dezaki (check!), and it still stands the test of time (double and triple check!). Aim for the Ace wins in straight sets!

#103 : Horus: Prince of the Sun

Horus_1I often wonder, was Horus: Prince of the Sun ‘born under a bad sign’? Many circumstances attempted to derail this early gem of the modern era of Japanese animation. It went over budget, it took more time to finish and even the parent animation company of Toei and it’s producers wanted to shelf this film. Why? This film had and even still has so much potential; it took chances and sounded a battlecry for a new generation of animators. And there in lies the answer as Horus: Prince of the Sun attempted to break free of the conservative standards of the day by telling a different story in both concept and direction. The results of this would honor Horus with critical notoriety over the years as one of the crowning achievements of the 1960s.

Horus_2By 1968 Isao Takahata had become a solid veteran in the animation industry and gained a reputation as a leader of those younger up and coming members of the industry in the 1960s. With both TV and film work of various degrees under his belt there was one achievement that this young man had left to fulfill and that was to direct a feature film. This opportunity came, but at a price. As mentioned before from the start this movie had some nasty karma associated with it. Producers at Toei, money and time all had a hand in stopping this film, but Takahata with his quiet demeanor and steadfast approach to being a director made sure that this film would get made, finished and then released.

The major controversy of this film can be traced into the story itself. The Norse mythology and look that was used was nothing more than a cover for another story that existed underneath. Japan’s native population, the Ainu, had for generations been looked down upon yet their culture was rich and diverse. A new generation wanted to adapt a traditional tale of the Ainu and present a more serious subject matter to give animation a more mature option. Both progress and change are a part of civilization and this new generation of artists and animators wanted to be at the vanguard of this movement. This was the 1960s after all and be it America, Europe, or Japan, the youth of the period were questioning and protesting against the rules and the establishment of their day.

Horus_3The story is a quintessential tale of the ‘Hero’s Journey’ (all hail Joseph Campbell) where our young hero Horus, sometimes translated to Hols, must integrate into the greater whole of civilization. This is a common theme I find in Takahata’s work and both sides of the extreme can be seen in Grave of the Fireflies (going against society and/or being ignored by society) on one end of the spectrum and Pom Poko (the community coming together for a common concern) on the other. Horus soon settles into a town and becomes a local hero after conquering a giant pike (fish) that prevented fish from being a food source to the local people. Soon afterwards he meets a wayward girl, Hilda, with a mysterious and unknown past and a large, very large, chip on her shoulder. Hilda is quite a complex character and her relationship with Horus is complicated and becomes a key element for the plot of the story as the film progresses forward.

Horus_4Horus: Prince of the Sun not only took more seriously the storytelling, but also on a technical level, the animation itself. This film amongst other examples of the era raised the standard of the quality of Japan’s output. Disney was the standard and Horus: Prince of the Sun is on par with the quality of the venerated classic Disney films. In certain aspects it excels, in particular with the action sequences with the pike fight and the final showdown. Of course Japan has always had an edge (my opinion) in regards to action and the movement and fluidity required to make those sequences work.

This is a film that has taken a few views on my part to fully appreciate the greatness to what Horus: Prince of the Sun truly is. Due to the issues with the production of the film it has it’s own way of unfolding the plot, which took me a little getting used to, but once I understood the whole of the scope of this film I came to love this movie. It’s classic Takahata and I recommend you to watch this one at least once to see where anime once was, where anime was going and see where this film has left it’s influence today.

… on a personal note, I dedicate this posting to the memory of Isao Takahata who passed away recently. Thank you good sir for your work and I for one will never forget the stories you shared with us all.

Isao Takahata
Oct 29, 1935 – Apr. 5, 2018

#102 : Armored Trooper Votoms: The Last Red Shoulder

VtLRS_1Do you want a proper story about revenge? How about a sequel that is more like a crucial missing chapter? Do you enjoy Armored Trooper Votoms? I hope you answered yes to all three of these questions because Armored Trooper Votoms: The Last Red Shoulder is perhaps one of the best examples of the early use for the OVA market to add depth to an already strong property. Prepare to strap into the Scopedog once again for yet another mission and this time, it gets personal.

VtLRS_2Chirico Cuvie may be the most fascinating character is mecha history. He is not heroic, hot blooded, or even a rookie to being in a mech. He is a stoic, slow burning and taciturn battle scared veteran. In more direct terms, he is one of the deadliest of the deadly, one of the Melkian army’s most feared killing machines, a Red Shoulder. Yet, Chirico and a handful of other cynical grunts are seen as undesirable for their acts of showing defiance towards the established military they are a part of. Biting the hand that feeds you! Years later and having survived the atrocities of the Hundred Years War of the Astragius Galaxy these four men reunite for a solitary cause, to go after the man who made them into Red Shoulders and then left them for dead. Their target is General Yoran Pailsen. After escaping a secret mission, torture and interegation and then the troubles of Uoodo City, Chirico joins these other three men and begin to plan. But can these four independent dissidents work well together?

VtLRS_3While Chirico may be the star of the show, he only represents half of this OVA. The second half belonging to his future adversary, the troubled and mysterious Ypsilon. We see his birth so to speak as he opens his eyes for the first time in an almost Garden of Eden like setting with the other so-called Perfect Soldier of the Votoms universe, Proto One, or in the eyes and heart of Chirico, Fyana. She mentors the naive young man before the influence of the training and brainwashing he receives from the secret society that Chirico is so interested to find out about. Watching this OVA gives a little perspective towards the humanity that was once in Ypsilon. It just goes to show that villains are just like the rest of us, just a little more perverted (hey not in that way kids) from internal or external circumstances.

VtLRS_4The beauty of this OVA is the fact that is acts like the lost 53rd episode of the TV series. Or, perhaps it should be episode 13 part 2 as this story sandwiches nicely between the first two arcs of the TV series: Uoodo City and the Kummen Jungle Wars respectively. No matter how this OVA is defined, The Last Red Shoulder is required viewing in the Votoms universe ONLY… if you complete the original TV series first. The plot and characters will make perfect sense as we see elements from the later parts of the TV series make small, but vital entrances. The production of a few more model kits may have paved the way to help finance The Last Red Shoulder, but the real substance so to speak is the revenge story and the new characters that we get to invite into our space for the time of about an hour. But as you near the end of this OVA you may crave some action and you shall be rewarded. The only question is who will make it out alive?

The rich palette of seriousness and gritty texture is what makes Votoms a special mecha property. Armored Trooper Votoms: The Last Red Shoulder smells of oil, blood and sweat, feels like bullet scared metal and looks of the dull nasty green of army surplus. War is hell and it can drive a man (or woman) to insanity, or leave personal traumas that need serious time to heal. Armored Trooper Votoms: The Last Red Shoulder brings you back into this dark world of dramatic hell that surrounds the politics and drama of the Astragius Galaxy and it does it so oh so excellently. Highly, highly recommended.

Recollections from Anime St. Louis 2018

Fun times! Good times! Were you there as well? I met a lot of great folks, saw a bunch of cosplaying and dragged out my beloved Macross: Do You Remember Love? t-shirt for another year’s wear, which by the way got recognized and I had a good 10–15 minute conversation from it. My friend Katie accompanied me for the third year and was a great help in videoing my panels. And though I gave as much boom to my voice, I should use a mic from now on because sometimes the P.A. can be your best friend. I am going to salvage what I can from the footage and try to get some time in for reshooting my speaking parts. Or, I can wait till next year with the benefit of being another year older and wiser.

I only went on Saturday since both of my panel were that day, so proud to make the BIG day after three years of Sundays. So I and Katie as well, made the best of a long Saturday. The first panel I went to was from RightStuf. They had a drawing for a either four Blu Rays from their Nozomi label and two more for a gift certificates. I got the $25 one! The dealers room had a lot of familiar sellers from the past and a couple new ones. I found a couple Roman Albums that I did not have to add to my collection, one for Nausicaa and one for Castle in the Sky (yeah Miyazaki films!). I love art books, particularly vintage ones from the 80s. I also found a figure of Casshan, which is a nice addition to my other figures. Plus, I got to meet a local group of adult LEGO aficionados that meet here in St. Louis. They had nice work on display and I am looking forward to going to their next meeting. Seems the law of attraction/universe wants me to get out my brick building skills again. 🙂

My first panel began at 5:00pm and I am glad I brought extra portable speakers as a back up, I needed them here. My presentation was The Shonen Jump Revolution of 1986 and I went through the 80s showing many example of Shonen Jump material, such as: Dr. Slump, Cobra, Cat’s Eye, Captain Tsubasa, Fist of the North Star, Kimagure Orange Road, Baoh and many others. I highlighted 1986 in particular and made the stars of my show the original Dragon Ball, Saint Seiya and the Fist of the North Star movie. My theory about these three is that they cemented the shonen fighting genre as the big popular genre we know today. Fighters didn’t start in 1986, they passed a threshold of no return in terms of their stance of becoming a successful genre that defines anime for many around the globe. I got to chat with a couple folks during my tear down and promote this blog; thank you all if you were there to see this one.

My second panel started at 8:00pm and with a title like Capturing the Wind: Miyazaki and Takahata before Studio Ghibli I was expecting a huge crowd. I did this one last year with a packed house for attendance, but updated some of the clips, rebranded my presentation and added a couple new entries. Studio Ghibli panels always draw a crowd and I wanted to tap into that potential as well, but in my own way. Hence the idea of showing their work from before Studio Ghibli became a good idea since there is a lot of great work from that era. Sadly some had to be turned away due to occupancy standards, but I will show this one again next year and will request a bigger room. And with about 80–100 in the room, some of them standing, I was glad to see the crowd, but like I said before I will use a mic next time because one man can not over power a room that well attended… well maybe Luciano Pavarotti or Andrea Bocelli, but I am not an opera singer. Again, thank you all for coming to this one as you were an awesome audience. I never felt so calm giving a public speech in my life… amazing! 🙂

Josh

#101 : Ulysses 31

U31_1Ancient Greek mythology is awesome! Don’t you agree? Such a wonderful storehouse of great storytelling and wisdom from a bygone era. We can take these myths on the exoteric level as historic documentation to the richness of Hellenic culture and esoterically as metaphors for you, the world we live in and greater spiritual envelope of our whole universe. Film and animation have had many adaptations from Jason and the Argonauts to Clash of the Titans. Japan has animated many examples as well with Saint Seiya and Arion coming to mind. But!… there is yet another example, a collaboration between the French company DiC and an old favorite here, TMS (Tokyo Movie Shinsa), that actually adapts the old myths into a 31st century universe instead of borrowing elements like the other two mentioned before. Have you seen Ulysses 31?

U31_2Hey look, it’s Space Jesus! I have heard that before in regards to our hero who does have an uncanny resemblance to the Christian icon. Yet alas, this is Ulysses my friends, the guy just has really awesome hair and that beard. He is readying his crew to return to Earth aboard the spaceship (that looks like a giant eye?), the Odyssey (well named). But first, we need to celebrate the birthday of his son Telemachus as the young boy is given a robot companion, Nono. You have to have that lovable, but kind of annoying robot character. Reminds me of Oon from Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors. Soon Ulysses and his companions set off when all of a sudden Telemachus becomes kidnapped. And like an awesome dad, Ulysses sets course to save his son.

U31_3Telemachus awakes to meet two Zatrians, Yumi and her older brother Numinor, to learn that they are to be sacrificed to the Cyclops to keep the priests vision intact. Far fetched, but amazing and those priests are scary too! Ulysses soon find the children and destroys the Cyclops and in typical fashion, Ulysses has to deal with that time old issue, Karma. This act angers the gods and now Ulysses has to find his own way back to Earth, via the Kingdom of Hades. That and all his companions, plus Numinor, fall into a sleep state and will awaken once he gets beyond the Kingdom of Hades. This leaves Ulysses to work with his son Telemachus, Yumi, Nono and the Odyssey’s onboard computer, Shirka. So begins the ‘Odyssey!’ Homer would be so proud.

U31_4A strength of this show is the fact that you can casually watch any episode in any order, except episodes one and 26 as these are the bookends for the series. Hooray this show has a solid openner and a satisfying closing episode! …No loose ends here… Take Ulysses 31 in any order you like, kind of like the old Choose Your Own Adventure book series. If you are aware of many of the tales of Ancient Greek myth you will be pleased to see the variety that have been chosen. We see interpretations of Oedipus’ trial with the Sphynix, the punishment of Sisyphus, Thesseus and the Minotaur, the enchantment of Circe and many more. The most surprising episode has our heroes going back to Ancient Greece itself where they meet their legendary counterparts.

In case you are a fan of The Mysterious Cities of Gold, both dubs feature the same cast. I have never seen the original Japanese dub, but if you have give me an update; same with the French dub as well. The show looks very much the era it was made, 1981. You might say it looks very Star Wars, but I want to think it looks more like the era’s Flash Gordon since this had a European influence, though it is not campy. Sci-fi had a certain flavor from the late 70s/early 80s that cannot be recreated. The technology may not have been up to far of today and the costuming at times can be a little goofy. Yet you get a lot of heart, which is what makes the era’s sci-fi and mecha so desirable (at least for me). Ulysses 31 is a solid show where heart and soul reigns supreme. May your journey to find the Kingdom of Hades be immortal and full of discovery.

#100 : Super Dimension Fortress Macross

Macross_1It’s #100 and I saved this one for this occasion. 🙂 In the far future of the year 1999… oh wait it’s 2018 now… don’t you hate it when the once thought of far future becomes a past memory? Well let pretend it’s 1982 once again, when a little show created by a bunch of anime and sci-fi fans hit the airwaves. Their story as stated before began in the year 1999 when suddenly a warp gate opens, bringing a behemoth of a spaceship into our local area of interstellar space. And much like a wild meteor with a mission, this ship came down like a speeding bullet onto a little island in the South Pacific. Ladies and gentlemen we humans are most definitely not alone anymore and this lone fictitious event in the sky is the beginning to THE most important anime in my whole fandom and life.

Macross_2Love is something you can’t describe with simple language and if you can, it really is not the passionate love you should feel from the bottom of your heart. In 1985, as an impressionable six year old, via an adaptation named Robotech, I fell in love with the most beautiful of space operas. NO, one of the greatest mecha anime ever. NO, the greatest love story that I have ever encountered. Well… maybe all three combined. I had experienced a story, characters and emotions that resonated with me on a level one cannot define. This was and still is a title many of us hold in the highest regards as something beyond special. It was one of my gateway anime and remains to this day the yardstick that I measure anything else I watch up to it… Super Dimension Fortress Macross.

Coming from my perspective and fandom and with all the variety of opinions already stating what happens in the show, the only thing I can give is what Macross has given to me on a personal level. Macross is not a television show, or even an anime. It is a part of my family, pure and simple; close knit family to be exact. These are my adopted brothers and sisters, aunts and uncles and best friends. Even though the cast are not with me in the physical plane, they have been instrumental in keeping me alive, healthy and happy. Macross for me is the Beatles’ In My Life, “there are places I remember… some have gone and some remain… all these places have there moments… In my life, I love you more.” I don’t see this posting as another entry, this is a soliloquy in the form of a love letter.

Macross_3Much credit to Macross is given to Shojo Kawamori (way too much!) almost as if it was “his” project alone, which of course is NOT true! But again where did Macross come from… a manga, toyline, yada yada… nope? It was it’s own creation, completely original and influenced by a group of young creative fans. An almost proverbial otaku’s dream come true, the purest form of fan service. Not the emphasis on the usual definition of fan service, but the wanting to add reference upon reference making the story grand and sentimental. You can give credit to others like Noburo Ishiguru or Ichiro Itano, but one individual makes Macross very special (my opinion)… the greatest character designer ever (again my opinion), Haruhiko Mikimoto!

Macross_4Mikimoto’s eye designs are always what win me over. Beautiful eyes with a romantic quality, they glisten like stars in the night (Mikimoto insists it was a shojo influence). Therefore this is the best looking cast ever (my opinion yet again), particularly our main cast… the perfect trio, handsome Hikaru, elegent Misa and adorable Minmei. Beyond the ‘main’ cast you have a huge subsidiary group and all of them get a couple minutes to show their individuality, but I have only been speaking of those of us who are all Earth born. Macross, after all, is an epic space opera and humanity meets another race from a far off area of the universe. Remember that spaceship I mentioned earlier that crashed onto the Earth… it is of interest of giant alien race, the Zentradi.

Macross_5Thus the plot begins… a spaceship gets refurbished, an alien invasion leads humanity into outer space, a war ensues, a young girl’s dream of becoming a pop star comes true, a love triangle becomes difficult and the questioning of the origins of both humanity and the warlike Zentradi are tied to the mysterious Protoculture (not exactly the same thing as in Robotech folks)… and stretches over 36 episodes in total. Wow! Busy show indeed and never boring. No wonder Macross reached the tops of popularity since there is something for everyone to enjoy. But then again like I said before, this was a show made by fans of anime, manga and sci-fi. They knew which buttons to push to get the reactions which we all can identify with.

Macross_6Wait a minute… I forgot to go into detail about one important piece of Macross that I love. One word… MUSIC! Music plays a major role in the plot and the soundtrack is oh so good. I love music, I play music and great music in an anime is a thumbs up from my end. Kentaro Haneda’s orchestral work is inspiring and certain tracks, in particular Dog Fighter, are anthemic. The character of Minmei and her pop idol status was one of the first iterations of this character archetype. Love it or hate it, Macross would not be the same without Minmei as the cheerleader so to speak. She was the true star of Macross, yet not the major protagonist who was Hikaru. Her simple pop songs, a blast of culture more precisely, changes the course of events in this show. Love conquers all, literally.

The closing titles features a song called Runner, a sentimental ballad. And I will end this entry by saying that Macross and I have run together a long, long time (hard to admit you are getting older, but wisdom is worth the age!). Hand in hand, Macross and I will run forever. …with 100 postings down, it’s time to write another 100! 🙂

 

Thank you everyone!

To all of you who have been following my work here for a while, or if you are fairly new to the Classic Anime Museum, I want say a simple and appreciative thank you. Last month was a milestone on many levels and this whole year of 2018 has been an awesome year of growth. Yet there is still much work to do as I have only just started with the 99 entries that are online. #100 will be a special one for me and hopefully for you all as well.

As I mentioned last month, I will be at my hometown con, Anime St. Louis, and will be presenting two panels: Capturing the Wind: Miyazaki and Takahata before Studio Ghibli and The Shonen Jump Revolution of 1986. My friend Katie will be recording video and my goal is to get these videos online to share with you all in case you can’t be a part of the live audience.

Arigatou gozaimasu,

Josh