#1b : Megazone 23 (part 1)

For my original entry for Megazone 23 (part 1), click here.

Sometimes you have to recover your tracks in order to move forward. In terms of classic anime and in particular, the first part of Megazone 23, I have a little more to say…

m231_1This is like going all the way back to the beginning. Starting from scratch, the second time around. If you have been through this site before, I hope you have dug down enough to find the very first entry, Megazone 23 (part 1). If you are new here, then you found a great starting point. I have had for some time thought about revisiting this awesome OVA from 1985, but I like to keep only one entry per show, movie, or OVA. Know you know what this means… time to change some rules!

m231_2Have I changed my opinions much on this first Megazone 23 entry from last time. Not really. I still love it, I still hold it highly in my anime watching experience and it is an all in one package for what did get me into anime in the first place and what mostly keeps me digging up more classics. It has that certain something, perhaps its just love and devotion, I can’t say for sure. And if I could put the feeling into words, I would more than likely miss the point. The character designs from Toshihiro Hirano and Haruhiko Mikimoto may be the closest thing to words to express my feelings for Megazone 23. Such a good looking cast from two of my favorite artists.

m231_3Now, have you seen The Matrix? Do you make references, or hear them often from others, regarding society and the The Matrix? Now watch Megazone 23 and tell me if you can spot the similarities? Megazone 23 came out a good decade and change before The Matrix and in my opinion totally surpasses the live action trilogy. We have the story about a hero who finds that reality is in control of a computer program and basically reality is someone else’s fantasy and creation. And our hero finds out he is only a mere pawn in the big game and decides to rebel. Except in Megazone 23 you also have motorcycle styled mecha, a lone wolf antihero, brighter colors, a refreshing soundtrack, Flashdance styled dancing (with leg warmers) and it’s Japanese in origin. “Yeah Doc, all the best stuff is made in Japan.”  (Back to the Future strikes again) The next time someone mentions The Matrix just remember to recommend Megazone 23, or even better… shout out BAHAMUT 6!

Still I regard Megazone 23 the spiritual successor to my beloved Macross. I said it last time and I will say it again, Megazone 23 may not be Macross in name or story, but the main members who created both productions left a certain patina. Kind of like a band releasing two awesome albums in succession. I mentioned Hirano and Mikimoto earlier and there are other key figures, but the biggest was director Noboru Ishiguro. Such a professional, a gentleman and a renaissance man all rolled into one. Hayao Miyazaki, Yoshiyuki Tomino, Tomoharu Katsumata, Osamu Dezaki, Rintaro, Isao Takahata are all great directors and I love them dearly, but Ishiguro-sensei, if it was not for your work I may never have fallen in love with anime. Arigatou gozaimasu.

Bar none this is a title I still watch on a consistent basis. Repeatability is a major factor to anything great in media as there is always something new and still yet familiar to emjoy. The only question remains, ADV dub, Streamline dub, or the original Japanese track. All three have equal merit in their own way. Or, I can be adventurous and watch Robotech: The Movie. Wikipedia or Google that one if that is a title that does not ring a bell.

… and don’t forget you see a cameo of Lupin and Gigen (Lupin III) as… cops… ironic!

#121 : Appleseed

Appleseed_1AppleseedGhost in the Shell’s often over shadowed older sibling. What comes to mind when I think of Appleseed? A nice, simple and powerful title for sure… iconic. There was all that CG material made a few years ago that I found to be dull yet flashy and fancy, but still… dull (very boring, my opinion). Thankfully I was aware that the tree that sprouted all those CG apples bore fruit a couple decades earlier in a shorter and much more analog version created for direct to video. Appleseed beyond the original manga, and those CG projects (nails on a chalkboard), is for me an OVA from 1988 that beyond the action had a theme that made me think and is the reason I come back one more time, every time.

Appleseed_2Is it me, or does this OVA smell a lot like Blade Runner (as well as concepts from ancient Greek mythology)? Many a cyber punk story often quoted Blade Runner since that movie set a standard that still holds up today. Still… Appleseed really borrows a lot from the 1982 film: the setting although it seems to have more sunlight, a particular character’s name and the idea of cybernetic technology in co-existence with mankind. We have a tale of a dystopian utopia, our possible future, or perhaps an allegory on our current circumstances. A perfect, clean environment that still has problems and issues because with all the polish and brightness, the polarity of darker forces must exist to ensure balance… all told with a lot of firepower and action. Masamune Shirow how do you do what you do so well?

Appleseed_3Olympus, the setting of Appleseed, is a great example of the utopian safety bubble showing signs of cracking and discontent. An ideal world where only good and cleanliness exist is in truth ‘unnatural’, night must follow day and winter always comes after a summer. And as much as you grip for control and authority, there will always be elements that stand to defy the status quo that slip through the veritable cracks. This is after all, a post war environment, as outside the city limits of Olympus is a perpetual no-man’s land, a literal hell. Here many humans exist on the edge of survival. If they are ‘lucky’ they get rescued and with help and rehabilitation are brought into Olympian society to exist with the main biodroid population. Biodroids are manufactured to be human in appearance and fit into the regime of the Olympian landscape. Many of these rescued humans fit into this paradigm with no issue, while others perceive and/or even fight back against what they see as a cage, or perhaps, a prison.

Appleseed_4Three of these rescued humans play the biggest roles in this drama. Our protagonists Deunan Knute and Briareos Hecatonchires (who looks more robotic than human?) work for the state as police officers, SWAT to be specific, which allows them to use their guerrilla combat skills that kept them alive in the hinterlands outside of Olympus. They have conformed for the most part into the society of Olympus. These two are perhaps an early attempt for the likes of Major Kusanagi and Batou of Ghost in the Shell… maybe? The third member is also a fellow police man, one Calon Mautholos, who unlike Deunan and Briareos, see a different reality due to the depression and eventual suicide of his wife. She saw Olympus as a cage and this leads Calon to align himself with more shady characters. Such as the terrorist A. J. Sebastian (hmm… Blade Runner again?) who believes that the society and government of Olympus is controlling and corrupting the human population and distancing themselves from their more primal behaviors. Calon joins forces with Sebastian and tries to stay one step ahead of the dynamic duo of Deunan and Briareos, who are after Sebastian when he escaped from an earlier raid.

Appleseed questions reality and duty towards a state or cause almost to the same degree as say Patlabor 2: The Movie. Though not as sophisticated as Patlabor, Appleseed does a great service for a simple one off OVA. And even though this has one of the most extreme cases of adulting up an English dub, you can always watch the original Japanese, which features some well known classic cast members. With all the love, popularity and hype for Ghost in the Shell, I seem to resonate and return to Appleseed more often. How about you?

#118 : Cosmo Police Justy

Justy_1Say hey there Space Cowboy, catch any outlaws today? … Who says the wild west ended during the time of covered wagons, cowboys and revolver pistols. I say let’s give this genre a sci-fi coat of paint. Why? … just because! And what do we get? A futuristic yet retro tale of Heroes and Villains. “Heroes and villains, Just see what you’ve done, Ba Ba Ba…” … ah yes, Beach Boys lyrics! (great band) … Back on track now, our entry this time round was one of the original direct to video releases, a pioneer (nice wild west pun!). A product of my beloved home base year of 1985 made by that talented group known simply as Studio Pierrot. A gem of an OVA, Cosmo Police Justy.

Justy_2Cosmo Police Justy was a release I became infatuated with just from viewing only still shots. Almost like love at first sight where one could not wait to have the date. When I was in the beginning of finding more obscure classic titles I set about certain parameters as a starting point and Cosmo Police Justy fit in quite nicely. The game was to find titles primarily from the middle part of the 1980s, usually sci-fi or space opera in flavor and then I left it all to my gut reaction determine if it would be a match. For Justy the character’s had a similar quality to Macross, though not as sophisticated as Mikimoto’s, and this was a big plus on my end (plus Justy has great hair, me oh so jealous). Also here in the U.S. a portion of the manga came out via Viz in their once comic sized format which aided the fansub release of the anime.

Justy_3The story consists of a basic good guy vs. bad guy premise, but also has a lot going on under the surface that shapes the overall plot. Revenge is the name of the game as the gang of the fallen criminal Magnum Vega plans to get their just desserts onto the well renowned Cosmo Police agent, Justy Kaizard. Justy’s reputation and super human esper skills brought down the venerable Magnum Vega, but doing so left much controversy and damage. Vega’s gang felt it in one way, but Vega’s daughter Astalis (Astaris) would take the situation in an entirely different way simply because the big bad Magnum Vega was not a criminal in her eyes, but simply dad. Enraged she would vow revenge on Justy when she would get to be big and strong. And then… she would from the power of anger, grow and mature in a matter of seconds… behold the power of science fiction.

As much as she would try, Astalis just could not take down Justy and in the process knocks herself out. Feeling troubled by what happened, Justy and his ‘sister’ Jerna (Jelna) would adopt Astalis and take care of her like family. Thankfully the shock of the fight between Justy and Astalis would give Astalis amnesia about the entire incident. Astalis, though looking like a teenager, has the innocence and mind of a young child and the only thing she knows is that she has two loving adopted siblings, Justy and Jerna. Will this peace and harmony between these three characters last forever? Or, is there something else bubbling under the surface that will shake this stable union?

Justy_4As mentioned earlier Cosmo Police Justy was a project from Studio Pierrot and because of this belongs to a select family. Pierrot would release the first OVA in late 1983, Dallos which would continue into 1984. By 1985 Pierrot would grow their direct to video releases to include several Creamy Mami titles, the great Area 88,  and the sentimental Fire Tripper, Plus lets add all the Urusei Yatsura madness that was ever so popular on both the small and cinematic screens. Cosmo Police Justy was a fellow sibling among these titles… now that’s a proper family!… I hate to play on the Pokemon catch phrase, but you should catch them all! Or as many as you can attempt.

The time to justify this piece of Japanese animation is now. Cosmo Police Justy justifiably is a legend, though more on the side of being a dark horse. Give this anime some of justice it deserves. No further adjustment is needed. … Does anyone else have more suggestions of using the word ‘just’ to help end this entry?

#117 : Cosmos Pink Shock

CPS_1“Well she was just 17. You know what I mean…” I love when I can get a Beatles reference in and yes it holds a purpose for this little half hour rarity from way back in 1986. So called one hit wonder OVAs, or perhaps one off or one shot is a better description, from the 1980s are a genre unto themselves. Combing through dustbins of fansubs and long forgotten VHS tapes one name often sticks out, Cosmos Pink Shock. Now that’s a title, but what is this? Cosmos Pink Shock sounds more like a weird offhand band, or an interesting name for a drink, but no it’s an anime. Just a simple anime

CPS_2Mitsuko Hayami (Micchi), a redhead of 17 years (see told ya the Beatles fit in here!), is on a quest and nothing and/or nobody will get in her way. She interrupts a championship baseball game, gets into the middle of battle skirmishes which have vague impressions of Macross (talk of culture, music, a mustachioed captain and bridge bunnies) and draws the attention of a bishonen (Gatsby/Gatsupi) who is cynical towards women and yet is beloved by a fanclub of girls, ironic. Maybe if Micchi could just politely give notice of her arrival towards each situation? Kind of like, “Hey all passing through here, PARDON ME!” Well… that wouldn’t be fun 🙂 … just don’t forget to check that fuel gauge from time to time so as to not run out at an odd moment.

CPS_3What everyone does not know is that all this speeding around is for a special reason. Micchi is on a mission… a very personal mission. And what of this mission? What would make a girl steal a spaceship and go through the cosmos like a bat out of hell? Why love of course! Micchi is on a mission to find her truest love, her betrothed, the boy who she keeps a picture of in her locket Hiro-chan who was abducted 13 years ago. Wait a second, 13 years ago… 17-13=4… Hiro was kidnapped at four year old? Micchi you are without question a loyal one, but falling in love and betrothing to someone at four years old? Only in anime. At the heart of a fun space adventure is nothing more than a pure love story. Some might see this as cheesy, but it exudes… cute. Case in point if you view the Pink Shock ship from the front it looks like the face of a teddy bear as an example.

By the end Micchi’s reputation comes full circle as all those that she once annoyed soon turn face to realize that she is doing all this for a just cause; in the name of love. This includes a fan club with membership dues and everything! Psst… I’m even a member because after all Micchi is a good kid at heart. That and she is designed by one of my favorite character designers Toshihiro Hirano (Megazone 23 (part 1) and Dangaioh) and Micchi definitely has that classic look of his character designs.

Cosmos Pink Shock is space adventure, a parody, not to be taken seriously and is due for a better quality transfer for my collection. Group this with a couple episodes from Space Adventure CobraDirty Pair: Project Eden and Maris the Chojo and you have a fun lineup of 1980s space comedy for a night in. “Now I’ll never dance with another, Oh, when I saw her standing there.”

#113 : California Crisis: Gun Salvo

CCGS_1Dude, this anime is so indie. It smells like vintage vinyl in a dusty record store. SNIFF… Whoo! They sure don’t make stuff like this anymore and to be honest how could you. California Crisis: Gun Salvo is a rare gem of an OVA that looks like nothing else, feels like nothing else and smells like nothing else… Smells? Am I going crazy? (shakes head) Far from it… “I’m California Dreamin’” on this anime.

CCGS_2How does one describe California Crisis? It’s  utopian fantasy set in that fantasyland of California. It’s also a romantic tale about being young and free. And it’s like an art house styled road trip movie with a sci-fi twist where the government is chasing two young protagonists who have a mysterious alien orb of a crystal ball that is the focus of everyone’s desire. “My precious.” All this chasing and mystery over what could just be an ultra shiny bowling ball. STRIKE! Sadly it is not a bowling ball. BOO! … California Crisis, from all descriptions, could fit itself into the realm of a live action film territory. And this could be the case, but it wouldn’t look or feel as good as a well animated film (my opinion). And California Crisis looks really good; I mean really, really good… in a mid 1980s sort of way.

CCGS_3Visually California Crisis stands on it’s own in the pantheon of Japanese animation. I have yet to see any other production look like California Crisis and trust me, I am still looking. The basic line work and character designs are of a typical style for the era… very recognizable here. The use of shading and color variation to produce these tones and the inclusion of flat colors in the background give California Crisis it’s distinctive look. Usually you see simple gradations to skin or cloth, but the approach here is to accentuate the colors and shadows to an extreme. Check out the outlining of the shadow and highlight areas. This reminds me of 1960s Pop Art, inline with say Andy Warhol, or Roy Lichtenstein, mixed with a dash of Psychedelia. California Crisis, is one of those rare examples of anime as art for art’s sake clothed in the ordinary.

CCGS_4The indie vibe of California Crisis can be traced to the studio that created it. A little studio by the name of Unicorn, Studio Unicorn to be precise. Several little startups were around in the 1980s and like many bands of popular music would release a couple projects and perhaps even give backup aid on other productions only to break up before hitting the big time. Studio Unicorn was one of these little studios, or perhaps an artist collective, that tried to make it and go against the odds with the established studio houses. As far as who they were and where they came from, well… those answers are beyond me. But I am than thankful for their contribution to the Japanese animation continuum.

Released in 1986 amongst a wealth of one-off OVA titles including M.D. Geist (yes I know a sequel came out a decade later), The Humanoid and Wanna-Be’sCalifornia Crisis stands out like a red headed step child. It looks different, it feels different and no matter what makes California Crisis different, I love it just the same. Being unique and individual always makes one special.

#112 : The Transformers: Scramble City

TFSC_1Now if that wasn’t a blatant toy commercial wrapped into the guise of an OVA, then I don’t know what is. Truth be told, I don’t mind because this OVA is for the original G1 Transformers. I grew up a fan of the transforming robot sci-fi epic and I am still loyal to ye olden tales of The Transformers (Autobot fan for life!). Yet this one off half hour entry was not on my radar screen back in the day. I had no idea it even existed, but as years passed I kept hearing about a story by the name of The Transformers: Scramble City. What makes this entry into the G1 saga so unique?

TFSC_2It is the year 1986, Hasbro In the west and Takara in Japan would unveil a new line of The Transformers for the upcoming year. The question would be how to promote this line prior to the third season of The Transformers cartoon (by the way if would be the second full season in Japan)? In America a huge blockbuster of a theatrical film was in the works and would be released in the summer. This film would not make it’s way to Japan until 1989, well past the lifespan of the first G1 timeline. Ironic since the film is crucial to the overall epic story of The Transformers. Yet Japan had another way to introduce the 1986 line. It would be a one shot direct to video release since the ever growing OVA market was blossoming.

The Transformers in Japan up to that point was only adapted material from America. The first two seasons were combined into the first series to be shown in Japan. Ironic how an original Japanese toyline would go to America, get adapted for that market and then return to it’s homeland with a different name (Diaclone and Microchange) to enjoy even greater success. Everything related to The Transformers in the realm of animation up to that point was western in origin, until Scramble CityThe Transformers are often categorized as anime, but the original G1 98 episode show technically is not. Yet Scamble City does count as anime since it was produced for the Japanese Domestic Market (JDM… any car enthusiasts out there?).

TFSC_3The story begins as a retelling of the beginning of the original TV series. Scenes from the first couple of episodes fly by into more contemporary scenes from what would be the second season. Optimus Prime and the Autobots are at a stalemate against Megatron and the Decepticons, a new strategy is needed. Now begins the original material where we see the Autobots building a large city type fortress. Now we meet a new character, Ultra Magnus, who is in charge of the construction. In essence this fortress is yet another character, remember Metroplex? Who knew that these two characters where on the scene before the plot of the movie?

TFSC_4Yet the construction of Metroplex is not the only main feature. The concept of how the toys play is also brought into the fore by the introduction to many of the famous gestalt combiners that include one robot as the body, two for arms and two for legs. A battle ensues near the end of the OVA (no surprise…) and one by one the Aerialbots, Stunticons, Protectobots and Combaticons become Superion, Menasor, Defensor and Bruticus. Sometimes certain members switched from arms to legs and at other times combined with different teams. Superion found that out the hard way! The OVA calls this ‘Scramble Power’, which is nice because we never had any cool naming conventions for the combining capabilities here in the west.

The Transformers: Scramble City was and still is a good little oddity in the G1 universe and is perhaps the most honest piece ever created for The Transformers. Just a simple toy commercial, but a very creative and longish toy commercial. Or perhaps it was a long lost episode for the second season here in America? We may never know…

#110 : Cool Cool Bye

CCB_1Tomonori Kogawa; can I see a show of hands who enjoys this man’s character designs and artwork? Or perhaps, how many of you know of this man at all? If not I hold nothing against you since he is not a well known name in the vain of say Miyazaki, Yoshitaka Amano or Gundam’s Yoshikazu Yasuhiko. Kogawa was a staple of early 1980s mecha shows; ever see Southern Cross (Robotech’s Masters saga), Ideon, Dunbine, Xabungle, L-Gaim, or even Odin: Photon Sailer Starlight (OH! ODINE!!!!). If you are familiar with these productions then you are framiliar with Kogawa’s particular art style, but he also worked on a couple smaller pet projects as well. One is called Greed, but let’s look at one called Cool Cool Bye for this entry.

CCB_2Cool Cool Bye. Cool Cool Bye. What does this title mean? I don’t know. Sometimes it makes me think of something that a baby would say… like Goo Goo Gah. Not saying that this OVA is for infantile intelligence (it’s not OK), but there is a fun almost child like simplicity to the art style, the dynamics of the motion and the spastic comedy which makes me think of more pompous, or perhaps ‘fancy’ terms like say surrealism, or even dada… oh great now this guy is going into early 20th century fine art… ! …make art, not war people. Cool Cool Bye is for me, kind of like the leftovers of Xabungle and Dunbine (we even have the cute fairy girl archetype again) mixed with something like Birth, or from a more modern eye, Gurren Lagann. This is the basic foundation of Cool Cool Bye and to top it off, this OVA is a manageable half hour of duration.

CCB_3Now since this is only an approximate 25 to 30 minute run, don’t expect something super deep and life changing. Giggles, laughs and ridiculousness is all that is required; popcorn can be optional. We have a basic plot here… two boys who are supposed warriors from a particular tribe are helping a little village get rid of a gigantic mecha known as the Tanguin, or Penguin (the fansub had both, perhaps it may be down to a regional dialect between the characters?) that is stealing all the women for some particular reason. And with a lack of a female population that means no continuation of future generations. Who or what would be stealing all the women… perhaps some dirty old man? AND I JUST SPOILED THE ENDING! Except I forgot to mention that the boys need to fill their stomachs first before any shenanigans can begin. Silly heroes always need to gorge food in anime, at least they won’t go into battle hungry, ya know?

CCB_4And what about the little fairy girl? At first I was like hey it’s Cham/Chum Huau from Dunbine (and whatever her name was in L-Gaim, please don’t make me revisit L-Gaim) in for a little cameo. But no, the little fairy girl transforms and changes into the pretty ‘it’ girl and very funny comic relief towards our duo of heroes. She essentially lays down the rules so to speak (don’t be no naughty boys), but also acts as the deus ex machina or McGuffin device to a pivotal moment near the end. In the ever constant of comedy and hijinks we get a singular moment of sentimentality… nice touch!

While not the most well known OVA, and perhaps there is a reason for this, Cool Cool Bye is a fun oddity of rarity. Not so much a diamond in the rough… more like a happy accident, but one that I was satisfied with. If you don’t enjoy the plot for any reason, just put Cool Cool Bye on mute and enjoy the scenery so to speak (because pretty pictures in the background makes the world a better place!), or make up another script if you are so inclined. For me though, I liked it!