#146 : Astro Boy (1980 TV Series)

AB80_1I bow down before thee, for you Astro Boy are the head patron saint of all anime. But wait, this is not the original version from 1963 that is often considered among the first modern anime to be conceived. No, this is not that version from 2003, nor that animated movie that was… umm… yeah. This telling of Astro Boy is like the middle child of the family, a reimagined version from 1980 that was under the full direction of it’s original creator, the man himself, Osamu Tezuka. I bow yet again. For this time round we present Astro Boy in FULL COLOR!, an upgrade from the black and white of the 1960s. So fancy! Heroes we look up to and admire come in all shapes, sizes and ages, but how many have the heart of an innocent child? Or even better, is an innocent child who is curious and sensitive to himself and everyone around him? Astro Boy is this and that’s why we fans love you!

AB80_2The character of Astro Boy… he is so cute and a lot like a stuffed animal. I just want to hug him and keep him safe from harm, but more than likely he will be the one protecting me instead. A mix of Superman, Frankenstein and Pinnochio that is rolled into an idealistic hope for the future, Astro Boy tells stories with an aesthetic originating in the 1950s/60s with animation advancements from 1980. We are in an idealized utopian world of the nuclear family, school days and good always triumphing over evil. Progress, optimism and the coming of advanced technologies spearheaded with science that includes a product that defines the show, robots. One of those robots is a young boy who was a clone of a boy who was tragically killed in an auto accident. The grief and guilt from the boy’s father led to the birth of our protagonist Astro Boy, which by the way, is the plot for the opening episode.

AB80_3The joy of Astro Boy is that really and truly is a show for children. And yes, it can also be enjoyed by the whole family, or even us youth minded adult types. The storylines for each episode are mostly simple to digest and easy to follow and often times you may be asking yourself, am I too old for this? And then the truth begins to shine from underneath, as is the magic of Osamu Tezuka. Tezuka’s humanitarianism and depth are renowned in every work he created, but it is in full display in Astro Boy. The bright colors and simple designs are just a package for the drama and lessons that each episode portrays. Nothing is held back, including at times the cost of one’s life. Astro Boy is a show with a high body count and often depicts some sort of sacrifice. The difference is that there is always a moral teaching behind everything. Tezuka does not lie to children and shows that loss and even death are a part of our lives and that violence is not always the answer. Tezuka’s Unico movies are of a similar caliber.

AB80_4Each episode is self contained so there is no overarching serialized story that comes to a final conclusion. The episodes featuring arch nemesis Atlas are the closest to a having a larger narrative and offers much in terms of drama. Atlas became my favorite character and his tragic story alongside his beloved Livian, brought much in terms of maturity and personal reflection. Many times anime portrays the villain, or antagonist, as a more appealing character than the hero; Atlas belongs with this grouping of classic beloved bad boys… and girls. On another note one special episode stands out. A crossover story, which features Tezuka alums Black Jack, Rock and Sapphire; a welcome treat for those of us who are fans of the ‘God of Manga’s’ work.

I whole heartedly recommend Astro Boy as a starter anime if you have young children. And for those of you who are full grown, such as myself and I am sure you as well, the 1980 version of Astro Boy is something of an oddity to consider if it crosses your path. Relive the 1950s/60s from the perspective of the 1980s in the current moment of whatever year you consider the present. In the end it’s all the same.

#81b : Space Warrior Baldios

For my original entry for Space Warrior Baldios, click here.

Sometimes you have to recover your tracks in order to move forward. In terms of classic anime and in particular, Space Warrior Baldios, I have a little more to say…

When I wrote the original entry for Space Warrior Baldios the only materials I had available were the first five episodes of the TV series, via fansub, and the film made from complied material with some revisioning. Then… I come to find out that the TV series would be released here in North America. Now I have an option to see Space Warrior Baldios in it’s entirety. I truly envy those of you who grew up in Europe during my youth, lets say approximately 1984 – 1990 as Baldios was available.

But one thing I have learned, never, but never ever be envious period. If you want something, be it an experience, a product, a relationship, whatever, give it space and focus. In time that something will happen, but don’t get too attached as that will sabotage your journey along the way. Persevering towards something eventually creates the greater payoff. Law of attraction? Wait a minute, this is a posting for my update on Space Warrior Baldios! Very true, let’s talk anime.

baltv_1The class of 1980 for TV mecha entries number about a handful, but I have seen two thus far to this writing. Last time I commented how Space Warrior Baldios and Space Runaway Ideon represented two of the most austere space opera robot shows to grace the small screens. I still agree with this, but after watching Baldios to completion I have to give an edge to Ideon. Baldios has it’s darker moments and elements and has a great twister of an ending, but Ideon went even deeper and I have to bow in respect as I love the dark (classic Yoshiyuki Tomino). But… but, I still I enjoyed Baldios. Ideon may be the more revolutionary show, but Baldios is for me, the evolutionary candidate.

baltv_2Ideon can be likened to the original Mobile Suit Gundam, or Zambot 3 as all three are attributed to Yoshiyuki Tomino. He has a well known style in his classic shows and he made mecha anime into a slowburn auteur exercise. Baldios on the other hand feels like the next step from the overall trend in mecha anime that was growing at the seams in the 1970s. It felt and partially looked like a show from about 1976/1977, but was created in 1980 (which honestly is not that far off). There is an element of innocence and fun that abounds in Baldios. Even the stock sequence for forming the three part Baldios robot harkens more to a 70s combination, GATTAI! Still Baldios has its moments of heaviness and drama as stated before, but the majority in terms of the overall plot of the TV series occurred more so in the beginning and ending of the episode run. Take Cowboy Bebop as a similar example.

baltv_3The in between episodes of Baldios showcase many of the minor plot elements of the characters such as reunions, unrequited loves, power struggles, trust issues and xenophobia as examples. Yet this TV series is sadly incomplete and truncated and in order to have the full story, you must watch the movie as well. Even with cancellation and necessity the one thing I can give respect to Baldios is the fact that the entirety of the story was eventually completed albeit in two forms of media. As classic mecha titles were my initial entry in anime, I am delighted to finally have the complete tale of Baldios under my belt. I shall wear Baldios like a medal with pride! Thank you time for teaching me to patiently wait all of these years to reap the greater reward.

#114 : Space Runaway Ideon

Space. The universe itself is vast and beyond scope. Space opera as a genre is also larger than life, but often you can hold it in the palm of your hand. Themes and characters are bigger than life, but still relatable on some level. What if space opera could represent something even bigger than just off hand spaceship battles, or fun times trekking through the deep vastness of the beautiful great void. Can space opera encompass the function and consequences of the living universe, call it ‘God’ perhaps, depending on the actions you and your civilization make? After finalizing Mobile Suit Gundam, Yoshiyuki Tomino and Sunrise would gives us an answer in 1980 with Space Runaway Ideon.

Ideon_1Space Runaway Ideon may be the most epic and most importantly, the most sublime sci-fi epic in existence within the realm of Japanese animation. Gundam is one thing, Legend of Galactic Heroes is another, but Ideon is it’s own animal. Ideon ventures into unique territory in terms of emotion, intensity and characterization. Known often as a series where everyone and everything dies (Kill ’em all Tomino!), the true meaning of this series is so much more. The death and sacrifices are all consequences and actions of conflict and hatred. This of course is a product of ignorance and xenophobia to an extreme that once the negativity reaches a certain point, the only option left is total and complete destruction.

Ideon_2Even with all this seriousness one must remember that Space Runaway Ideon is first and foremost a mecha show. And what a giant robot indeed (105 meters/344.5 feet for a height), the Ideon is imposing beyond belief and is one of two mechs that literally scare the $h!& out of me (the other being Giant Robo). This is not so much for the overall size or power, but more so on the presence a mecha exudes. It’s about total respect. All this from what looks like a mix of a Gundam’s GM and Gun Cannon added together on a heavy dose of steroids. Literally… as this is a robot that can split a planet in half. This is power beyond power, almost ‘God’ like, hence why I give the Ideon such respect.

Ideon_3Beyond the drama and the Ideon robot itself, Space Runaway Ideon like many of the best mecha shows is about the relationships of it’s cast. And like many Tomino shows, this cast is large. Our story concerns two factions that make contact on a planet in the Andromeda galaxy. Earth based humans like us have begun colonization on the planet which they call Solo. Beyond the colonization, many of the scientists and researchers have discovered several artifacts from a past civilization including three huge truck like vehicles and a buried spaceship. The second faction known as the Buff Clan (yes that is their name) are on a mission to locate the legendary power of the Ide. They come upon this same planet, which they call Logo Dau and eventually both civilizations meet. In response, both sides start a conflict showing the darkest side of human interaction towards someone or something that is unfamiliar, or different.

Sadly Space Runaway Ideon would be become a victim of cancelization, most likely due to a lack of ratings not unlike the previous year’s Mobile Suit Gundam. This left several holes in the plot and a rushed ending. All the build up of 38 episodes led to an ackward final 39th. Yet the story was not over for in 1982 two movies would be released to finish the story properly. The Ideon: A Contact would act as a review and prequel to the awesome and powerful The Ideon: Be Invoked. I highly recommend both movies if you want to get the whole story of Ideon.

Ideon_4To conclude with Space Runaway Ideon, let us examine a quote by Albert Einstein… “The most important decision we make is whether we believe we live in a friendly or hostile universe.” If that decision in the end is a hostile one, there is nowhere to go except toward ultimate destruction… think about it. This applies not only to anime space opera, but also our lives as well. Similar to, but not the same as Evangelion, Ideon addresses the power of how we sometimes view our environment and ourselves and what happens in regards to how we react toward it. Space Runaway Ideon was and still is a show beyond any experience I have known and I will always count it as one of my all-time favorites.

#81 : Space Warrior Baldios

For an updated perspective on Space Warrior Baldios, click here.

Baldios_11980 was an interesting year for anime. On a personal note, I turned a year old, so I don’t have much personal memory. Only from researching and back cataloging through history, I found two of the most austere mecha space opera ever conceived. Space Runaway Ideon is the first, a show directed and created by Gundam’s Yoshiyuki Tomino (the year after Gundam to be precise) that took a mature stance dealing with themes of xenophobia and the awesome power of a collective conscious deity power. The second, and the subject of this entry, was Space Warrior Baldios, a tale about time travel, unrequited love, planetary destruction and pollution. Whoa… where have you been all my life Baldios?

Baldios_2I may forever have an incomplete appreciation of all that is Baldios. I have only come across the first five episodes of the 1980 TV series with an English translation. If I grew up in Europe this would be a different story. I know on the mainland, and in particular Italy, you had this on your TV screens back in the day. A compilation film would be released in 1981 and this is my only way, as of the moment, to enjoy the story as complete whole. Although… the TV series didn’t finish on a proper note anyway and the film actually gave a more finalized finality. Hmm… kind of like the Ideon films. I see a trend here? … The Baldios film is in my hands in two forms, the first being a fansub with the original Japanese dialogue and the second, a VHS release with an English dub by an early producer William James Ross. Definitely a treasured piece in my collection.

Another time, another place. The future and a heavily polluted planet known as S-1. Scientists work diligently to find a method to clean the pollution and restore this planet to it’s former glory. Enter our hero, Marin Reigan. After years of work his father, a top rate scientist, and his team have finally come to a solution. This does not go well with the military who become the higher authorities under the control of the totalitarian General Gatler. Gatler’s solution is to leave the planet and find new a colony. Marin’s father would fall victim to the rise of the military and in revenge Marin enacts revenge on his father’s murderer. That revenge killed a man who would put Marin into an interesting relationship with a beautiful female soldier. She is Aphrodia, or Afrodia, and her brother was the man Marin killed.

Baldios_3Once Gatler leaves S-1, Marin follows in pursuit in an awesome spaceship, the Pulsar Burn. In an odd twist of fate through traveling in null space (warping), Marin would end up appearing in front of our Earth in approximately the year 2100. Upon his arrival he is brought into question about who he is and if he has anything to do with Gatler’s army who is by now attacking the Earth. Soon he would gain the trust of the Earth’s military and scientists, including Dr. Ella Quinstein (such an awesome name). Marin’s Pulsar Burn would become part of a three part machine that unites to become the warrior robot Baldios to defend the Earth.

Baldios_4And this is only the beginning… Besides all the usual mecha space opera cliches we have to turn back to Aphrodia and her relationship with Marin. There’s is a fated and yet unrequited connection of love and hatred. How odd a couple can be so perfect and yet, so flawed. If anything this is the great draw of this show in how these two play off each other. Another draw of interest is the lack of children in the cast. Most mecha shows were of the shonen variety, so usually a character of a child, usually a boy, is included to say… this can be you in the story. In Baldios, we are in a hard and adult world. And finally, I have to mention the great twist of fate at the end; talk about a surprise ending. If you know how Baldios closes, you know one of the best endings in my honest opinion.

Baldios you are a rare bird in a sea of the usual in mecha and science fiction stereotypes. Space Warrior Baldios is dark and tackles issues that pertained to the world of 1980 and even still in 2018 (the writing of this entry). Should we allow war and hatred to destroy our relationships, our culture and ultimately the environment of the planet? A cautionary tale… a classic!

#77 : Toward the Terra

I love science fiction, can’t help it because a). it’s in my DNA to be into the future and far out subject matter and b). I was born into a generation where there was a flood of it. Right place at the right time indeed. In my early days of searching for more of the grandiose tales of the future and outer space I would come across a tale of social dissatisfaction, totalitarian government, social order and the rise of the individual and evolutionary diversity that can’t be ignored. This was the pride of 1980, the promise of a decade to come, the beautiful and austere Toward the Terra.

TtT_1Often we think of science fiction as a grandiose showing of space battles and action, but the real focus of great science fiction is in the commentary of the social condition of the now. These are the great myths and stories of our contemporary age told to criticize actions that need to be addressed right now. It is about our feelings, our ideas, our hopes, our dreams and our fears. The Toei produced film adaptation of Keiko Takemiya’s manga, To Terra, is one of my favorite tales of social critique. Kind of like The Matrix meets Star Wars mixed with the mood and the finding of one’s humanity of Blade Runner. Why do I watch anime, cartoons, or whatever you want to call this stuff? Toward the Terra is one of my best answers.

TtT_2In a society where children are born of test tubes and raised by foster parents until the age of awakening, 14 years, there are those who don’t fit into the criteria. Jomy Marcus Shin is one of these children. He acts impulsively, has odd nightmares and a strong sense of individuality. The government has their eyes on him, because he may be one of the Mu, an advanced form of humanity with esper powers that is a threat to the conformity of the current status quo. The system must hold it’s population in check to keep humanity from making the mistakes of the past that destroyed the great planet of Terra, Earth. Individuality is the enemy, being special is the enemy, being different is the enemy, being who ‘YOU’ really are is the enemy.

TtT_3Along with Jomy are two other important characters, the first being the leader of the Mu, Soldier Blue, who is looking for his successor. Despite his youthful appearance he knows his advanced age is creeping up on him. And the second is the mysterious Keith Anyan, one of the system’s elite who was literally, born and prepped for his position in life. Keith much like Roy Batty in Blade Runner has to come to terms with his existence and what is right not for the system, or government, but for the greater of the human race. These are not our only characters, an understudy of Jomy named Tony will also appear later in the story that spans over the lifetime of this generation. Much like a Legend of the Galactic Heroes kind of epic with all the characters and drama, but without all the military tactics.

TtT_4As I have said earlier this may be a tale of the future, but this is a tale of the now be it 1980, or 2017 (the writing of this blog). How much do we lose as we grow up? How much of yourself is really you? Are you really honest with who you really are? Are you happy, I mean really happy? These are questions asked in the film, but are also questions we ask ourselves not in some far of distant galaxy far, far away. Seriously, we all have asked these questions. And why can’t more science fiction follow this format? This was what made sci-fi oh so awesome back in the days of yore, but alas they are a little more rare in these days… or are they?

For those of you who are more into the modern style of contemporary anime, you are in luck as there is another adaptation, a TV series, of Toward the Terra that was released in 2007. The manga is available as well, but of the three options I prefer the film that I have been writing about. We all have a choice and I respect your decision, but this movie moved me the most, made me feel the most and as of recent upon re-watching this movie, I connected on yet another level. I can’t explain it in words, I only hope you enjoy this wonderful story as well.